Plaish Hall 6582

Cardington, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Plaish is a fine, brick house dating back to about 1580, with a court to its south. It is one of the earliest brick-built houses in the county. The hall, which incorporates parts of an earlier stone building (possibly a castle or fortified manor house in existence since 1255) was set within the south-eastern part of a medieval or 16th-century park, but this was lost at enclosure. Nonetheless, in 1868, the remains of the castle's moat were still visible.

History

Plaish Hall was built around 1580, within the south-eastern part of an existing park. It was built for William Leighton, Chief Justice.

Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Cardington
History

Detailed History

Plaish Hall was built around 1580, within the south-eastern part of a park (already present by 1577) which had a central lodge. It was built for William Leighton, Chief Justice. A local legend suggests that a man he employed to build the house’s ornate chimneys had previously been condemned to death by Leighton, and that he undertook the work on the promise of freedom if the chimneys proved to be the finest in Shropshire. Upon completion of the job, it is said that the labourer was hanged (perhaps from one of the chimneys), notwithstanding the above agreement.

The park was used as general pasture by 1671, and was enclosed between 1675 and 1676. In 1914 an elaborate design for Renaissance-style gardens at Plaish was illustrated, but there is no evidence that it was ever executed.

The 17th-century poet and composer, William Leighton (son of the above William Leighton), lived at Plaish Hall.

Period

  • Medieval (1066-1540)
References

References