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For Key Stage 1 and 2 teachers, parks are an easily accessible and rich resource for areas of learning, including, historical, geographical and social understanding, and understanding physical development, health and wellbeing..

For young children, parks are places of fun, activity and discovery, and applied projects that involve visiting them will be a memorable experience.

For Key Stage 3 and 4 teachers, parks can be the focus of a compelling learning experience, spanning the curriculum, and which develops students’ personal learning and thinking skills. Engagement with these vital open spaces will help young people appreciate their community value and how parks contribute to a healthy lifestyle.

Using parks also underpins the government’s ambitions for The Children’s Plan, realises the expectations of the government’s Every Child Matters agenda and reinforces the aspirations of the Learning Outside the Classroom Manifesto.

Photograph of two children standing in front of a lake

There are a large number of resources which can be used in the classroom or on a visit to a local place to assist with learning more about historic parks and gardens.

Topics and Garden History provides specific information about historic parks and gardens and information about people involved with their design.

The RHS Campaign for School Gardening inspires and supports schools to provide children with gardening opportunities to enhance their skills and boost their development. Courses are free with the exception of some CPD courses, the campaign doesn't just welcome schools, anyone gardening with young people can join in.

Park Explorer: London Parks Discovery Project Park Explorer has been developed by the London Parks and Gardens Trust, with the generous assistance of the Heritage Lottery Fund, to provide information and education resources based around London's rich wealth of parks and open spaces.

The Great Plant Hunt This exciting project will encourage children to explore the natural world around them and join other schools in the biggest ever school science project. Forming part of the Darwin 200 initiative, The Great Plant Hunt invites primary school children to follow in the footsteps of Darwin by going on nature walks in and around their school grounds. They'll find out more about plants and in the process learn key scientific skills.