Juniper House, Stretham (also known as The Rectory)6206

Stretham, England, Cambridgeshire, East Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features of Juniper House include a walk, tennis court, herbaceous borders and grass plants.

History

Juniper House was created in the early-17th century and is now the home of the National Autistic Society.

Detailed Description

Early photographs show a tennis court with mature trees, and the Ordnance Survey map of 1887 shows a lawn to the west of the Rectory, edged with trees, mainly coniferous, with a serpentine walk amongst them. These mature trees can still be appreciated today from the west of the village, but the sales particulars of 1994 include views of an overgrown garden.

Today the vicarage is called Juniper House and is the home of the National Autistic Society. The garden has been replanted with a wide herbaceous border with several pampas grass plants and the old cedar, mulberry, walnut, yews and holly are now well cared for.

Features
  • Tennis Lawn
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  • Path
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  • Walk
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  • Herbaceous Border
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  • House (featured building)
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Stretham
History

Detailed History

Juniper House, formerly The Rectory, was built during the early-17th century, remodelled in the 18th century and stands in .75 hectares of mature grounds, south of the village church. Former residents of the Rectory should be better known as they include Mark Ridley (1560-1624) who became physician to the Czar of Russia. His father was the Rector of Stretham. The Rector H. H. Baber (1775-1869) was at one time Keeper of the Printed Books at the British Museum.
References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust