Wolfson College, Cambridge 3969

Cambridge, England, Cambridgeshire, Cambridge

Brief Description

Features of Wolfson College include a mound, wrought iron railings and gates, lawns, yew hedges and a timber pergola.

History

Wolfson College was established in the mid-20th century.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.wolfson.cam.ac.uk/

Detailed Description

The simple paving layout and planting retains existing mature trees and a row of seven mature cedars, originally along a low mound, have been protected at ground level from root compaction. The College is approached along a new drive bordered with hornbeams within a yew hedge. The Front Court is enclosed by wrought iron railings and gates, which have also been used to enclose the College's grounds along the Barton Road. A garden to the west of the Seminar Room has been planted to shield the impact of the car park. Originally a peat garden it is now backed by a yew hedge and planted with low growing conifers around an astrolabe in memory of the first President, John Sinclair Morrison.

To the east is Lee Court, with simple lawns enclosed by a timber pergola supporting roses and wisteria. The college now owns Norton House and its rear garden with mature cedar, willow and silver birch. Nearby is the President's Lodge with its private garden. To the north is the Lee Seng Tee Hall with plantings of hellebores, ivies, medlars and pulmonarias, and nearby are the Betty Wu Lee gardens with a mature cedar and contorted willow. These existing trees have been incorporated by Paul Edwards into a pleasing garden with willows and bamboos growing along a low wall between Chinese rocks. The garden contains a small octagonal metal bandstand. The college incorporates existing houses within its layout-Breedon House, Plommer House, Norton House-and also four houses along the Barton Road.

The largest of these houses is No. 78 Barton Road, which until recently was the home of Sir Vivian Fuchs. He established yew topiary in his garden in the shape of a very tall penguin with an egg in euonymus between its feet. This stands amongst tall Wellingtonias, three cedars and giant sycamores. To the rear of his house is a small formal kitchen garden consisting of six plots between brick paths enclosed by yew hedging. A jasmine arch is provided along the yew hedge.

No. 74 Barton Road still retains it timber garage and shed in the front garden and the spring bulbs beneath the mature trees make a pleasant understorey. In the rear garden are two fine weeping limes and a shrub border, but with the removal of some of the garden fencing the trees, as at No. 78, now become part of the College grounds. There is interesting planting along the Barton Road frontage, where the existing hawthorn hedge has been layered and behind are rows of newly planted yew and holly.

Features
  • Pergola
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  • Ironwork
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  • Lawn
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  • Hedge
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  • Topiary
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  • Kitchen Garden
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Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

http://www.wolfson.cam.ac.uk/
History

Detailed History

Wolfson College was founded by the University as ‘University College' in June 1965. Following a substantial gift to the College by the Wolfson Foundation in 1972 the college name was altered. The site is along the Barton Road, and includes several existing houses and their gardens. In 1972 the first new buildings were designed by Ferrey and Mennin of York and accommodation was provided around Front, West and East Courts.
References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust