St Bride's Fleet Street Churchyard 9017

Greater London, Greater London, England

Brief Description

Many famous people are connected with the church including John Milton, Samuel Pepys, Samuel Johnson and Charles Dickens. On the north side of the church the raised railed churchyard has a number of mature trees, areas of paving and seats, with gravestones set into the ground.

History

The church is dedicated to the C5th Irish St Bride or Bridget and has existed here for some 1500 years, possibly the first place in London where Christianity was practiced. The old church was destroyed in the Great Fire in 1666 and the current building is the eighth on the site, rebuilt by Wren by 1680. Its spire, once higher, was completed in 1703, the highest of Wren's steeples and apparently the inspiration for the first tiered wedding cake. It is known as the Printers Cathedral or Journalists Church after the first printing press with moveable type was brought here in 1500.

Visitor Facilities

The site is open from Mon-Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 10am-12.30pm and 5.30-7.30pm.
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The site is open from Mon-Sat 8am-5pm, Sun 10am-12.30pm and 5.30-7.30pm.

Directions

Tube: Blackfriars (District, Circle). Rail: Blackfriars
History

Period

  • 12th Century
References

Contributors

  • London Parks and Gardens Trust