New Southgate Cemetery and Crematorium (also known as Great Northern Cemetery)7250

London, England, Greater London

Brief Description

The cemetery was laid out by Alexander Spurr on a concentric plan with a Gothic chapel with a fine 150ft spire in the centre, and bounded by railings, with elaborate Gothic ragstone gate piers at the entrances. The landscape contains mature trees, especially in the southern, older section, which is wooded and quite naturalised. Oak, horse chestnut, sycamore and yew are found in the newer area although this is more open. Monuments include a late C19th obelisk erected by the Society of Friends and a walled garden with a large marble column surmounted by a golden eagle.

History

Formerly called the Great Northern Cemetery, New Southgate Cemetery was founded by a private cemetery company in 1861. The interior of the chapel was converted to a crematorium in the 1950s.

Visitor Facilities

7am-6pm November-February; 7am-8pm March-October. Office open weekdays 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-12

Detailed Description

New Southgate Cemetery was founded by a private cemetery company in 1861, rendered necessary as inner London burial grounds became increasingly crowded. There was originally a special branch line of the main Great Northern Railway connecting the cemetery from Kings Cross, hence its earlier name. The cemetery was laid out on a concentric plan with a Gothic chapel in the centre, and has mature trees, especially in the southern, older section. Oak, horse chestnut, sycamore and yew are found in the newer area, which is more open. Monuments include a late C19th obelisk erected by the Society of Friends and a walled garden dedicated to Shogi Effendi, the Baha'i leader.

Sources consulted:

Bridget Cherry & Nikolaus Pevsner, The Buildings of England: London 4: North (Penguin, 1998) p175; Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer, 4th edition (The History Press, 2008); Jan Hewlett, Ian Yarham, David Curson, 'Nature Conservation in Barnet' (London Ecology Unit, 1997).

For more information see http://www.londongardensonline.org.uk/gardens-online-record.asp?ID=BAR055

Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

7am-6pm November-February; 7am-8pm March-October. Office open weekdays 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-12

Directions

Tube: Arnos Grove (Piccadilly) then bus. Rail: New Southgate. Bus 34, 251.
History

Period

  • Victorian (1837-1901)
References

Contributors

  • London Parks and Gardens Trust