Cranesden (also known as Cransden)5667

Mayfield, England, East Sussex, Wealden

Brief Description

The site has an Elizabethan house surrounded by a late-19th century and early-20th century garden and park. Features include an orchard, kitchen garden, two lakes and a chain of ponds.

History

On the Ordnance Survey 1st edition map (1813) there is shown a building labelled 'Cransden' with a stream to the south but no indication of a garden or pools. The 1874 Ordnance Survey 6\" map shows the development of the land around the house.

Features
  • Orchard
  • Latest Date:
  • Kitchen Garden
  • Latest Date:
  • Lake
  • Description: There are two small lakes to the west of the house and a larger one to the south.
  • Latest Date:
  • Garden Terrace
  • Latest Date:
  • Walk
  • Latest Date:
  • Pond
  • Description: A whole chain of ponds runs from the north-west to the south-east over the path of the stream, to the south of the house.
  • Latest Date:
  • Tree Feature
  • Description: Lines of trees follow the old field boundaries in the extensive parkland to the east of the house.
House, Stream
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Mayfield and Five
History

Detailed History

Abbs (1999) cites Kelly's, presumably around 1900, describing ‘A fine old Elizabethan house, enlarged and added to by successive owners. It stands in its own grounds of 150 acres. The residence of Mr Francis Marshall.'

According to Bell-Irving (1928) 'it was bought some fifty years ago by Thomas Woolner, the sculptor,' who added a carved timber front that he removed from Shrewsbury. Foster, writing about 1960, noted that Lord Godber, one-time head of the Shell oil company, lived at Cranesden.

On the Ordnance Survey 1st edition map (1813) there is shown a building labelled 'Cransden' with a stream to the south but no indication of a garden or pools. The 1874 Ordnance Survey 6" map shows the development of the land around the house but it looks predominantly utilitarian. There is a large orchard and a kitchen garden, as well as two small lakes to the west of the house and a larger one to the south.

By the time of the Ordnance Survey 6" map (l899) there are new buildings and a more designed landscape. The biggest lake has increased in size. There is further elaboration of the garden shown on the Ordnance Survey 6" map (1911). To the south of the house are terraces and walks. A whole chain of ponds runs from the north-west to the south-east over the path of the stream, to the south of the house. Lines of trees follow the old field boundaries in the extensive parkland to the east of the house.The most recent map consulted, the Ordnance Survey 6" map of l976, appears to show a similar layout.

References

References

Contributors

  • Dennis Cooke

    1

  • Sussex Gardens Trust