Isenhurst 5672

Heathfield, East Sussex, England, East Sussex, Wealden

Brief Description

The name 'Isingherst' exists at least as early as 1575. The park is shown on the 1813 Ordnance Survey map. Features include a stream, lake and kitchen garden. The estate looks much the same on the Ordnance Survey 1\" map (1940) and the Ordnance Survey 6\" map (1981), although at the last date there is no sign of an enclosed kitchen garden.

Detailed Description

As far as it is possible to judge, the estate looks much the same on the Ordnance Survey 1" map (1940) and the Ordnance Survey 6" map (1981), although at the last date there is no sign of an enclosed kitchen garden.
Features
  • Lake
  • Description: There is a narrow lake about 150 metres from the house. By 1899, the lake was widened and divided lengthways in two.
  • Latest Date:
Stream
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Mayfield and Five
History

Detailed History

In medieval times the manor of Isenhurst belonged to the archbishops of Canterbury (Holgate, l927). Abbs (1999) states that it belonged to Michelham Priory. After Cromwell, it was granted to Sir Richard Sackville. Later it passed to the Mayfield branch of the Baker family, ironmasters.

The manor is marked on Saxton (1575) as ‘Isingherst'. A mansion and park, well surrounded by shaws, is shown on the Ordnance Survey 1" map of 1813, though it is not named. The park is about one quarter the size of the nearby Heathfield Park.

On the Ordnance Survey 6" map (1874), there is a mansion in the middle of radiating areas of parkland and shaws, well-intersected by paths. A stream flows through the estate and there is a narrow lake about 150 metres from the house. About 800 metres from the house are enclosed areas (in total about one hectare) which probably form a kitchen garden.

Paths become elaborated on the Ordnance Survey 6" map (1899), the lake is widened and divided lengthways in two, and a garden appears to the south-east of the house. Much the same picture is shown on the Ordnance Survey 6" map of 1911.

References

References

Contributors

  • Dennis Cooke

    1

  • Sussex Gardens Trust