Woodcote Manor Park (also known as Woodcote Manor)5083

Winchester, England, Hampshire, Winchester

Brief Description

Woodcote Manor, of medieval origins, lies in a small late-18th-century landscape park. The walled garden, dating back possibly to the 17th-century, is still planted as in the 19th century. In 1911 Sir Reginald Blomfield made changes to the park and garden to give them more structure. Interesting listed buildings include the 17th-century coach house and barn and gardener's cottage by Blomfield.

History

The origins of the manor of Woodcote lie in the reign of Richard I in the late-12th century. The oldest surviving parts date from the 17th century. These consist of the manor house, the walled garden, the coach house and a barn. The park was enclosed in the late-18th century. New developments followed. A new stable block was built, a ha-ha separated the lawn from the park, and two stew ponds were created just beyond the ha-ha. Little changed in the 19th century, but in l911 Sir Reginald Blomfield made new designs for the house and garden.

Detailed Description

There are many points of interest in the estate. There is the survival of the 18th-century parkland with its trees where it is still possible to make out the course of the old drive. The woodland copse remains and is particularly colourful in the spring, with daffodils and bluebells. The kitchen garden is little changed from its layout and plantings from the late 19th century. It is a good example of a kitchen garden of that time.

The collection of ancillary buildings is of interest too. Both coach house and barn in the yard are listed buildings and the stables, though not so old, occupy the site of the original stable block. The gardener's cottage, designed by Blomfield is close by and is also listed. Blomfield's other designs for the park and garden remain, defining the garden areas around the house in a more formal way.

Features
  • Kitchen Garden
  • Description: The kitchen garden is little changed from its layout and plantings from the late-19th century. It is a good example of a kitchen garden of that time.
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  • Lawn
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  • Gazebo
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  • Stable Block
  • Description: The stables, though not so old, occupy the site of the original stable block (late-18th-century).
  • Topiary
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Ha-ha
  • Description: A ha-ha separated the lawn from the park.
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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  • Pergola
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  • Pond
  • Description: Two stew ponds were created just beyond the ha-ha.
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  • Garden Building
  • Description: The gardener?s cottage, designed by Blomfield is close by and is also listed.
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  • Building
  • Description: The 17th-century coach house.
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Bramdean and
History

Detailed History

The origins of the manor of Woodcote lie in the reign of Richard I in the late 12th-century. The oldest surviving parts date back to the 17th century. These consist of the manor house, the walled garden, the coach house and a barn. Around these buildings lay a small park, wooded behind the house and open to the west in front. The drive to the house wound through the park along an avenue of sweet chestnuts.

The park was enclosed in the late 18th-century. New developments followed. A new stable block was built, a ha-ha separated the lawn from the park, and two stew ponds were created just beyond the ha-ha. Little changed in the 19th century, but in 1911 Sir Reginald Blomfield made new designs for house and garden. By diverting the carriage drive to a new entrance he created more space for lawns. To these he added a pergola and gazebo. He introduced brick walls and topiary which gave the house a more formal setting.

Period

  • Late 18th Century
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here
References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust

  • Leila Beale

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