West Ham Jewish Cemetery 7309

London, England, Greater London

Brief Description

The cemetery is laid out simply, with tombs surrounded by gravel, straight paths and little vegetation. The original prayer hall was demolished and a new one was built in 1874. The most prominent monument in the burial ground is the magnificent circular mausoleum designed by Sir Matthew Digby Wyatt for Evelina de Rothschild who died in childbirth in 1866.

History

In 1857, with its Brady Street Cemetery full almost to overflowing, the congregation of the New Synagogue joined with that of the Great Synagogue, becoming the United Synagogue, to buy land for a new cemetery.

Visitor Facilities

The site is open by appointment only.

Detailed Description

In 1857, with its Brady Street Cemetery full almost to overflowing, the congregation of the New Synagogue joined with that of the Great Synagogue, becoming the United Synagogue, to buy land for a new cemetery. A plot of just over 2 hectares was purchased from the Quaker banker and local landowner Samuel Gurney who had previously sold land adjacent to this to the West Ham Burial Board for its new West Ham Cemetery. The cemetery was later extended to its present size and is laid out simply, with tombs surrounded by gravel, straight paths and little vegetation. The original prayer hall was demolished and a new one was built in 1874. In 1960 the remains from a small Jewish Cemetery in Hoxton Street were reinterred in the north of the cemetery.

Sources consulted:

Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, 'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008); The United Synagogue website; Bridget Cherry, Charles O'Brien, Nikolaus Pevsner, 'The Buildings of England London 5: East', (Yale University Press, 2005 ed)

For more information see http://www.londongardensonline.org.uk/gardens-online-record.asp?ID=NEW035

Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The site is open by appointment only.

Directions

Rail: Maryland.
History

Period

  • Mid 19th Century
Contact
References

Contributors

  • London Parks and Gardens Trust