Petton Hall 6408

Petton, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Petton was a small rural parish (now part of the parish of Cockshutt-cum-Petton). As well as the hamlet of Petton itself, it incorporates a largely 19th-century park, with kitchen gardens and wooded areas placed within a designed landscape overlying medieval it medieval predecessor.

History

The park had medieval origins, but was heavily redesigned in the 19th century after sale to the Sparling family at the end of the 18th century.

Features
  • Fishpond
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  • Moat
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  • Pool
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  • Icehouse
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  • Motte
  • Description: Castle mound.
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  • Garden Building
  • Description: Lodges. By the late 19th century the park had two lodges.
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Petton
History

Detailed History

Although the Petton estate incorporates medieval features, most information is known about the 19th-century phase of the park. The estate was sold to the Sparling family in 1794. By the early-19th century the Hall had an extensive park extending principally to its north, and to a lesser extent, its south. The boundaries seem to have changed little between then and 1880, although at the earlier date there was also a small, triangular tongue of land running past Petton church. In 1851, Petton's kitchen gardens and vineries were said to be highly productive, and the park was said to be richly wooded; the 1889 Ordnance Survey map suggests many of those trees were in relict field boundaries.

The house was rebuilt in 1892 as a large neo-Elizabethan brick mansion, placed close to the site of its immediate predecessor, as well as a medieval moat and castle mound, fishponds, an ice-house, and Petton church (1727 and later). By the late-19th century the park had two lodges, both on the Ellesmere-to-Shrewsbury road.

The grounds of the estate are implicated in discussions surrounding the late-18th-century divorce of Edward and Hannah Corbet, when the former was reportedly observed going into the summerhouse with his under-dairymaid. This snippet provides interesting information regarding ideas of privacy and social space in the 18th-century estate.

References

References