Park Hall, Oswestry 6407

Oswestry, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Today Park Hall Farm incorporates a variety of areas, spread over 40,000 square feet. Key features include restored Victorian farm buildings, museums dedicated to life in the 19th century, and woodland walks. In early 2009 the reconstruction of an Iron Age roundhouse was begun on site.

History

Park Hall was built around 1571 in the grounds of Whittington Castle park. The grounds were developed over the succeeding years, and by the early-18th century included a terrace and summerhouse. By the 19th century there was a small park surrounding the hall, but the latter burnt down in the early-20th century. Today the area is a popular country park, and the site of a range of activities.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.parkhallfarm.co.uk/...

More information
Features
  • Manor House (featured building)
  • Description: Half-timbered. Lost to fire in 1918.
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  • Terrace
  • Description: Raised terrace.
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  • Summerhouse
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  • Drive
  • Description: Tree-lined drive.
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Walk
Access & Directions
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Whittington
History

Detailed History

The park occupies an important part of the Shropshire landscape, close to the medieval Whittington Castle, as well as an Iron Age hillfort at Oswestry.

We know that in the early-14th centuy, when the park was one of the Earl of Arundel's three such properties, horses were kept at Oswestry.

The large, half-timbered house known as Park Hall was built in around 1571, in the already extant grounds of Whittington Castle park, and close to the site of its moated lodge (see record for Whittington Castle park). It was built for Thomas Powell.

The grounds were developed over the following centuries, and by 1726 the gardens included a raised terrace, a summerhouse, and an inscribed sundial. The summerhouse still stood in 1761, when an inventory demonstrated that it contained two chairs and a table. The same inventory also recorded rollers (presumably for paths and lawns) and glasses for hot beds.

Greenwood's Shropshire map shows that in 1827 Park Hall was surrounded by a small park, bisected by a straight, tree-lined drive to the house. These seem to have still been extant in 1889, when the Ordnance Survey undertook the production of the 6-inch map for the area.

Park Hall burnt down in 1918, but today the park itself is a popular local attraction, with woodland walks, reconstructed farm buildings (dating back to the 19th century), museums, and a range of outdoor activities. In 2009 work commenced on the reconstruction of an Iron-Age roundhouse.

Period

  • Tudor (1485-1603)
References

References