Horeham Manor 5710

Wealden, East Sussex, England, East Sussex, Wealden

Brief Description

The house was probably built in the 17th century, but has been much-altered. The grounds included sweeping terraces, lakes and a semi-circular avenue of trees. It is not clear whether or not these still exist.

Detailed Description

There is an article entitled ‘Old Horeham Manor' in Sussex County Magazine, Vol. 3, 1929, p. 661. ‘The sweeping terraces as well as the bowling green in the grounds of the old mansion can still be traced, being now converted into a tennis court on one side of which runs the original wall.' A semi-circular avenue of trees marks the drive which came in from the road and back to it, apparently planted to avoid the toll gate which lay between the two entrances. In 1929 the manor was owned by a Mr and Mrs Lindsay and run as a residential hotel known as Manor House Hotel. There were lakes with flamingos, water fowl and swans.
Features
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: Pevsner states (Sussex: p. 540) `Manor Farm. Late-16th or early-17th century. Mainly ashlar with mullioned windows.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Bowling Green
  • Description: Converted into tennis court before 1929.
  • Tree Avenue
  • Description: An article of 1929 states, 'A semi-circular avenue of trees marks the drive which came in from the road and back to it, apparently planted to avoid the toll gate which lay between the two entrances. '
  • Lake
  • Description: In 1929 the manor was owned by a Mr and Mrs Lindsay and run as a residential hotel known as Manor House Hotel. There were lakes with flamingos, water fowl and swans.
Garden Terrace
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Horam
History

Detailed History

The following is taken from ‘Waldron, Its Church, Its Mansion and Its Manors' by Rev. John Lay (SAC xiii 100-3, 1861). Before 32 Henry VIII, the Horeham estate had become the property of Thomas Walsh. He and his third wife Joan had the previous year bought Halland in East Hoathly which in 1557, Goddard Walsh their son, sold to Sir Nicholas Pelham. (See Horsfield, Volume 1, p.358).

In ‘English Baronets' by Collins, Volume 3 p.608. Mr Dyke married the daughter of T. Walsh of Horeham, gent (by the daughter and heir to Horeham of Horeham). Joan inherited in 1616. The mansion was probably built by Thomas Dyke. The north front still retains most of its original features but the rest of the building has undergone great changes, having being converted into a farmhouse.

A great demolition took place 60 years since when large foundations of what had probably been buildings of a more ancient date were dug up and a considerable quantity of the materials of the house, then reduced in size were carried to Southbourne...The terraces and bowling green of the old mansion may still be traced...A large culvert also which extends from the house quite across the turnpike road in front of the mansion bespeaks it the remains of a mansion of great extent./

I have seen an estimate of the timber standing in and about the grounds and ready to fell in year 1702. The trees were 1883 in number and among them were 30 trees of 2 tons, 902 about a ton, 150 near a ton and 420 about 30 ft. But the park has been given up to the ploughshare. The second baronet, Sir Thomas Dyke married well and became owner of Lullingstone Castle in Kent and moved there in 1720 since when the house has been in the occupation of a family called Mannington. Mr Isaac Mannington is the present tenant.

References

References

Contributors

  • Barbara Abbs

    1

  • Sussex Gardens Trust