Hinxton Hall 5609

Hinxton, England, Cambridgeshire, South Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features of Hinxton Hall include lawns, drives, walled kitchen gardens and ornamental trees and shrubs.

History

Hinxton Hall was created in the mid-18th century as a private residence. In the mid-20th century the Hall was converted into offices.

Detailed Description

The sale particulars of 1900 record the two carriage drives with the principal one having a pretty lodge at the entrance. The mansion was surrounded by pleasure grounds and gardens, with a large well-timbered park in which was a sheet of water. There were two walled kitchen gardens, a vinery and glasshouses.

Extending towards the park were wide stretching lawns, decorated with flower beds and intersected by broad gravel paths. The grounds were adorned by magnificent ornamental trees and shrubs, charmingly laid out and inexpensive to maintain.

Features
  • Lawn
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  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Glasshouse
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  • Vinery
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Gate Lodge
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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  • Drive
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Hinxton
History

Detailed History

Hinxton Hall is a three storey red brick house built between 1748 and 1756 for John Bromwell Jones, and is flanked by late-18th-century wings. It replaces an earlier 18th-century house on the same site.

Until the middle of the 20th century, the hall stood within a park, which was established between 1833 and 1886, when the existing village street layout was altered.

In 1953 the Hall and park was sold to Tube Investments Ltd, who built extensive office accommodation in the grounds. Now it is the home of Genome Research Ltd.