Hinchingbrooke House 5966

Huntingdon, England, Cambridgeshire, Huntingdonshire

Brief Description

Features of Hinchingbrooke House include a gatehouse, lawn, clipped yews, a cottage ornee, a garden terrace and a terraced path through the woodland.

History

Hinchingbrooke House was established in 1538 as a private residence for Sir Richard Williams. The House is now a school.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.hhpac.co.uk/default.htm

Detailed Description

The entrance to the house is from a re-located 16th-century gatehouse through a courtyard with a circular lawn and clipped yew bushes. Extensive lawns to the east lead to a terrace with fine views across the landscape. To the west is open woodland with forest and exotic trees. In the forest is situated a 19th-century cottage ornee with a small, box-edged garden with a pool, terraced path and fine oak tree, with a wrought iron seat.

A newly planted rose garden with a lattice wall on the site of an earlier rose garden is now protected by a conifer hedge. The Japanese garden beyond the former kitchen garden has now been lost. Alconbury Brook has been made into a canal along the south-west boundary, and nearby is an allee, 630 yards long, planted with chestnuts and recorded on the 1757 estate map.

Features
  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Lawn
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  • Rose Garden
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Garden Terrace
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  • Gateway
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  • Path
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  • Allee
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

http://www.hhpac.co.uk/default.htm
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Huntingdon
History

Detailed History

In 1538 the land (the site of an Augustinian nunnery) was given to Sir Richard Williams (alias Cromwell). The property was extended in the late-16th century and early-17th century. In 1627 it was sold by Sir Oliver Cromwell (uncle to the Lord Protector) to Sir Sidney Montague.

By 1660, the owner was Edward the second Earl of Manchester, who had carried out elaborate work to the grounds which Samuel Pepys recorded in his diaries. Hinchingbrooke House is now a school.

Period

  • Tudor (1485-1603)
References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust