Haslingfield Hall 5684

Haslingfield, England, Cambridgeshire, South Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features of Haslingfield Hall include garden walls, a moat, pigeon house and an orchard.

History

Haslingfield Hall was established in the mid-16th century as a private residence.

Detailed Description

The Hall was situated within a three-sided moat and surrounded by a small park, the whole bounded by a brick wall. By 1815 all but the east end of the house was demolished. The 17th-century brick bridge over the moat and a pigeon house survive, both shown on R. Relhan's painting of 1814.

The park was 8.4 hectares in 1810, had already been reduced in size, and is still being encroached upon today. The original garden contained an extensive orchard, pleasure garden, a terrace and a rusticated brick gateway. A later painting by Relhan shows the nearby church and part of the park wall.

Features
  • Orchard
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  • Moat
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Garden Terrace
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  • Pigeon Loft
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Haslingfield
History

Detailed History

Sir Thomas Wendy, physician to Henry VIII, built Haslingfield Hall in 1555. Queen Elizabeth I left here for her famous address to the University in 1564 and her image on a white charger is now the village emblem.

Period

  • Tudor (1485-1603)
References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust