Durants Park 7767

London, England, Greater London

Brief Description

The park initially had a bandstand and drinking fountain, but by the 1930s facilities for tennis, bowling and putting, and an athletics track were provided.

History

Durants Park is named after Durrants, a sub-manor of the Enfield Estate dating from the 13th century. From the early-15th century Durants was owned by the influential Wroth family and James I reputedly visited frequently. In the 18th century Sir Thomas and Lady Stringer lived here, whose son William married a daughter of the infamous Judge Jeffreys. Fortifications on an outbuilding were said to have been erected for his protection. In 1910 this and the remains of the moated manor house, Durants Arbour, were demolished. In 1903 Enfield UDC had bought around 14 hectares of estate land for a public park.

Visitor Facilities

The park is open from 8am Mon-Sat / 8.30am Sundays to dusk (refer to Council website for seasonal details).
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The park is open from 8am Mon-Sat / 8.30am Sundays to dusk (refer to Council website for seasonal details).

Directions

Rail: Southbury then bus. Bus: 121, 279, 307, 310, 310A, 363
History

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)