Charlton Cemetery 7190

London, England, Greater London

Brief Description

The layout has serpentine paths, and is much the same today as the Victorian layout shown in a drawing in the 'Illustrated London News' in 1857. It has a pair of 19th-century chapels; the Church of England chapel is Early English style; the Roman Catholic Chapel is in Decorated style. The cemetery has original stone-capped walls topped with railings and a tile-hung lodge although the original lodge was demolished. Planting is a little sparse and apart from some holm oaks, it lacks large trees but good recent planting includes monkey puzzle and larch.

History

The cemetery was founded in 1855 as an exclusive 8-acre \"Gentleman's Cemetery\" by Charlton Burial Board on land which was originally part of the estate of Sir Thomas Maryon Wilson. It was later expanded by a further 7 acres in the 20th century.

Visitor Facilities

The site is open daily: April-Sept 9am-7pm; Oct-Mar 9am-4pm

Detailed Description

Charlton Cemetery was founded in 1855 by Charlton Burial Board on land that was originally part of the estate of Sir Thomas Maryon Wilson. Its Victorian layout of serpentine paths is little changed and it retains the pair of C19th chapels although the original lodge has gone. Among the memorials are numerous monuments to the army and navy and personnel connected with the Royal Artillery at Woolwich and other notable people including Sir Geoffrey Callender, the first Director of the National Maritime Museum, and Sir John Maryon-Wilson, Lord of the Manor of Hampstead who was instrumental in the preservation of Hampstead Heath.

Sources consulted:

Hugh Meller & Brian Parsons, 'London Cemeteries, An Illustrated Guide and Gazetteer', 4th edition (The History Press, 2008)

For more information see http://www.londongardensonline.org.uk/gardens-online-record.asp?ID=GRN010

Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The site is open daily: April-Sept 9am-7pm; Oct-Mar 9am-4pm

Directions

Rail: Charlton then bus. Bus: 53, 54, 422, 486 (walk).
History

Period

  • Victorian (1837-1901)
References

Contributors

  • London Parks and Gardens Trust