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Berkeley Square

Introduction

Berkley Square is a communal garden established in 1787 by Thomas Paty on a sloping site.

Terrain

Sloping

The garden of Berkeley Square is an irregular quadrilateral, mostly grassed over, enclosed by a low hedge on all sides. There are gates into the garden at several places. There are several trees planted irregularly in the garden, and some shrubberies and flower beds. There is also a rectangle of levelled ground. The architecture around Berkeley Square is well-preserved.

The garden is maintained by volunteers. The grass is cut regularly and there is a programme of tree planting being carried out. The garden suffers to some extent from the numbers of people using it. There is a problem with litter, and also with damage caused to the grass, but by and large it is in a good state of maintenance.

Contact
Features
  • Sculpture
  • Description: This feature is the Bristol Cross. It was created by John Norton in 1851. The Cross is an imitation of the original High Cross of 1373, which stood in various places before being taken to Stourhead Green, where it still stands. Norton's Cross stood originally on College Green, but was moved to Berkeley Square in 1950.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Town House (featured building)
  • Earliest Date:
Visitor Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The square is in Bristol city centre, and is open for general public access.

Designations
  • Conservation Area
  • Reference: Park Street and Brandon Hill
  • The National Heritage List for England: Listed Building
  • Reference: Bristol Cross
History

History

Berkeley Square was laid out in 1787 by Thomas Paty.

Detailed History

Berkeley Square was laid out in 1787 by Thomas Paty. The surrounding buildings were only completed in the early 19th century. It is unusual among the Georgian squares of Bristol in that it occupies a sloping site, and this makes the unity of its architecture difficult to appreciate. It was designed to be open on the south-east side, but is no longer so.

Period

  • 18th Century
  • Late 18th Century
Associated People
References

References

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