Red Lodge 2784

Bristol, England

Brief Description

At Red Lodge there is a reconstruction of a Tudor privy garden. The garden is stocked with plants which could have been found in England by 1630.

History

The garden is laid out on the remaining one of formerly eight walled gardens of The Great House, dated to 1589. The house was built for Sir John Yonge on the site of Colston Hall.

Visitor Facilities

The house and gardens are open from 10 until 5 from Saturday to Wednesday, closed on Thursdays, Fridays and over the Christmas break.

Detailed Description

All that is left of the gardens is a small square of land, enclosed on all sides. At the time the garden was last surveyed (1984) plans were being made to plant a knot garden on the site. The outlines of the beds and of the closed knot were all that was visible.

Features

Style

  • Tudor-Style Garden
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The Red Lodge dates to 1589, and is now much altered externally. It is built of red stone rubble with dressed quoins and a stone band at first floor level.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
Herbaceous Border
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The house and gardens are open from 10 until 5 from Saturday to Wednesday, closed on Thursdays, Fridays and over the Christmas break.
History

Detailed History

The Red Lodge was built in 1589 for Sir John Yonge, a wealthy merchant, whose Great House occupied the site of the present Colston Hall. The gardens were laid out on the slope between the Red Lodge and the Great House. Rocque's plan of Bristol (see references) shows eight walled gardens existing here at that time.

In 1854, the Red Lodge opened as a Girls' Reformatory, run by Mary Carpenter.

Period

  • Tudor (1485-1603)
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here

Other websites

Owners

  • Bristol City Council

    The Council House, College Green, BS1 5TR
References

References

Contributors

  • Avon Gardens Trust

  • E.T.Thacker

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