Balsham Manor 4125

Balsham, England, Cambridgeshire, South Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features of Balsham Manor include a complex maze, an orchard, lake, tennis court and conservatory.

History

Balsham Manor was established in the early-17th century.

Detailed Description

Balsham Manor has a complex yew maze. The maze was designed and planted by Jim Potter. The maze was planted in 1993 and has two types of trees in its hedges: green yew and a golden yew. The golden yew hedges are about 100 metres long and form the shape of a treble clef. There are more than 1500 trees altogether. The paved centre, which is a little higher than the rest of the maze, is in the middle of the treble clef and is entered through one of two archways.

Each year, when the hedges are cut, the fresh clippings are collected for processing into Taxol which is a naturally occurring cancer treatment drug. The paths are nearly half a mile long and are all grass, except for two lengths which are brick paved. Each of these brick path areas form the shape of a French Horn.

In the middle of one horn there is a mound, covered in roses and with a symbolic sculpture on top. This is by John Robinson and is called ‘Joy of Living'. In contrast, the middle of the other French Horn is a pit.

The music maze is within a garden consisting of a lake, wild flower meadow, orchard, lawn, herbaceous border, spring bulb area, tennis court, mature specimen trees, shrubs and a conservatory.

Features
  • Orchard
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  • Ornamental Lake
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  • Shrub Feature
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  • Lawn
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  • Herbaceous Border
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  • Tennis Lawn
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  • House (featured building)
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  • Sculpture
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Balsham
History

Detailed History

Balsham Manor was built in early-17th century, and was enlarged in the late-18th and 19th centuries.