Horseheath Lodge (also known as The Lodge)5597

Horseheath, England, Cambridgeshire, South Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features of Horseheath Lodge include a walled kitchen garden and plantations.

History

Horseheath Lodge was established in the early-19th century.

Detailed Description

The Lodge is situated in a small fold in the landscape through which flows a tributary of the River Granta. The grounds are enclosed by boundary planting with specimen trees in the long, narrow park. To the north of the Lodge is a walled kitchen garden and stables. There are plantations of conifers and deciduous trees to the south east of the Lodge.
Features
  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Plantation
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Horseheath
History

Detailed History

In 1803 the Horseheath Estate passed to Stanlake Baston, son of Henry Baston, who built this large gault brick house between 1815 and 1825 to the west of the parish, on a former heath and park. He incorporated red bricks from Horseheath Hall for the foundations, cellars and garden walls for the new house called The Lodge.

The Batsons were keen sportsmen and interested in horse racing. They had a private training ground at The Lodge called the Gallop, now used for Point-to-Point races. Here Lucetta was bred by Mr. Stanlake Batson, and in 1829 was sold for 1,800 sovereigns. His horse ‘Plenipotentiary' won the Derby Stakes in 1834.