Washingley Hall 6266

Washingley, Huntingdonshire, Cambridgeshire, England

Brief Description

Features of Washingley Hall included a kitchen garden, fishponds, curved garden walls, lawns, a summerhouse and a lily pond.

History

Washingley Hall was created in the 17th century as a private residence. The house was demolished after 1934, and the garden layout was mostly lost.

Detailed Description

Washingley Hall was approached through a fine pair of wrought iron gates supported on stone pillars surmounted by eagles which still stand today. The drive terminated in a gravelled forecourt. The house was demolished after 1934 but the layout of the drive and garden walls can still be seen in the grass.

To the east of the house the walls of the kitchen garden still remain and the fishponds are beneath the mature trees which once formed the pleasure grounds. The curved garden wall foundations from the south front of the house can also be found in the grass. These stone walls had arched recesses with seating. A paved terrace leads directly onto the extensive south lawn. It is interesting to note that during the early-18th century, Charles Bridgeman bought an inn for his wife in Stilton, and may have been involved in the garden at Washingley.

When Lord Cobham acquired the property, the south gardens contained clipped yews around flower beds, and there was a summer house and lily pond. The south garden would have been bounded by the moat. The stable block to the west is now a farm. All these are within a park with fishponds, pheasantry and stew ponds.

Features
  • Garden Wall
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  • Pond
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  • Fishpond
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  • Lawn
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  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Summerhouse
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  • House (featured building)
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Folksworth and
History

Detailed History

Washingley Hall is to the west of the village of Stilton near to the remains of a castle. The house was built in the 17th century, remodelled and enlarged in the 18th century, on the site of an earlier property.
References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust