Walthamstow Marsh (also known as Walthamstow Common Marsh)9506

Greater London, England, Greater London

Brief Description

Walthamstow Marsh, now designated a Nature Reserve, is one of the last surviving examples of natural marshland in the London area. Grazing ceased in 1934, but was re-introduced in 2003. Hay continued to be cut from parts of the marsh in late summer to help maintain its diversity of plants and animals.

History

Walthamstow Marsh still exhibits subtle signs of the post-glacial landscape and of the ancient Lammas lands system of management, under which the marsh was used for the common grazing of cattle, hence its historical name of Walthamstow Common Marsh. From spring to late summer the Marsh was left to grow and cut for hay according to a system of plots.

Visitor Facilities

Opening is unrestricted.
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

Opening is unrestricted.

Directions

Rail: Clapton then bus/walk. Bus: 22a, 55, 56, 48
References

Contributors

  • London Parks and Gardens Trust