Halston Hall 5657

Whittington, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Halston Hall is a late 17th-century brick building, associated with John Mytton of Shropshire.The park was designed in the 18th century, and included fishponds and woodland. Nineteenth-century reworkings saw the creation of new water features, parkland, kitchen gardens, wooded areas and greenhouses.

History

The hall dates back to 1690, but the grounds were first designed in the 18th century, with extensive changes and developments made in the 19th century.

Detailed Description

Halston Hall is a nine-bay brick building of 1690. Inside there is a saloon of 1766-8 by Robert Mylne, who also added adornments to the exterior. Immediately next to the Hall is one of the county's two timber-framed ecclesiastical buildings.The hall is surrounded by landscaped grounds.

Features
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: Halston Hall is a nine-bay brick building of 1690. The aloon, and a number of external features, are by Robert Mylne.
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  • Pond
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  • Lawn
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  • Tree Feature
  • Description: Woodland known as 'The Park'
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  • Pond
  • Description: Serpentine Pond
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  • Kitchen Garden
  • Description: 5 acres in size.
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  • Greenhouse
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  • Tree Feature
  • Description: Pineries.
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Whittington
History

Detailed History

Pevsner notes the existence of a monastic foundation at Halston, but states that 'no traces remain', and also records a timber-framed chapel in the locality.

The Halston estate has been in the Mytton family since the 1560s. However, it is unclear exactly who was responsible for the design of the various aspects of the grounds. William Emes, active in the late 18th century, is said to have worked there, although in the 1770s drawings for ponds there were done by Slater. In 1765, informal lawns lay north and south of the Hall. East and north-east of the house lay several ponds, presumably for fish. Two of those ponds were enveloped in a long strip of woodland, 'The Park', (which survived in 1873) extending towards the Evenall-Barghill road.

By 1808 there had been considerable changes, notably the creation of a serpentine pond sweeping west and south of the Hall. By 1827 there was also an area of parkland south of the pond well screened by a belt of woodland, and reached via a dam or bridge below the Hall. In 1837, that area was referred to as 'New Park'.

By 1837, five acres of kitchen gardens had been laid out just outside the northwest extremity of the park. Pineries and greenhouses were being constructed in about 1851, and by 1901 the timber was large, especially the beech trees, and a heronry was noted.

Period

  • 18th Century
Associated People

People associated to Halston Hall

References

References