Fletcher Moss Gardens 5168

Manchester, Greater Manchester, England

Brief Description

Fletcher Moss Park is part botanic gardens and part wildlife habitat. The amenities include a rockery, rose pergola garden, heather garden, orchid houses, pond and a wildlife meadow. There is also an interesting selection of trees and shrubs.

History

The 4 acre garden was first created by Robert Wood Williamson by the mid-19th-century. Along with The Croft (house), the garden was sold to Alderman Fletcher Moss in 1912. He in turn donated the estate to Manchester Corporation in 1919. Manchester City Council have retained a number of the original features as well as enlarging and enhancing the park.

Visitor Facilities

This is a municipally-owned site for general public use. Please see: http://www.manchester.gov.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=2236

Detailed Description

Fletcher Moss Park is part botanic gardens and part wildlife habitat. The original four hectare site, shown on the 1848 Ordinance Survey map, lay north of Stenner Lane and close to Didsbury village. The grounds were subsequently enlarged to 8.5 hectares by including the meadow that streches west to the River Mersey. The park now offers a range of recreational, ornamental and educational amenties including the more formal garden plantings, a pond, an interesting selection of trees and the wildlife meadow.

The gardens include a rockery created by Robert Wood Williamson and extended in the 1950s, an 1940s orchid house, an alpine house opened in 1967, a rose pergola and a heather garden. The rock garden is protected by walls and the gardens are mainly on a south-facing slope, both of which facilitate the growth of less hardy species. Royal ferns, marsh marigolds, skunk cabbage, Gunnera and some species of iris surround a puddled-clay pond at the foot of the rockery which supports several terrapins and fish. School groups participate in planting the meadow with wildflowers under the supervision of the warden

The trees include Chusan palms, tulip tree, mulberry, dawn redwood, swamp cypress, Chinese dogwood, Adam's Laburnum, common walnut, Oxydendrum arboreum, dwarf conifers and many others.

The Park has held a Green Flag Award since 2000.

Features
  • Orchid House
  • Description: This was built to house a donated orchid collection.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Rockery
  • Description: The rockery was created before 1912 and extended in the 1950s.
  • Latest Date:
  • Bed
  • Description: The beds include heathers and other species.
  • Rose Garden
  • Description: The rose pergola garden was created in the former bowling green.
  • Pond
  • Description: The pond lies at the foot of the rockery and is surrounded by a variety of marsh plants: Royal ferns, marsh marigolds, skunk cabbage, Gunnera and some species of iris. There are terrapins and fish in the pond.
  • Tree Feature
  • Description: Trees in the park include Chusan palms, tulip tree, mulberry, dawn redwood, swamp cypress, Chinese dogwood, Adam's Laburnum, common walnut, Oxydendrum arboreum, dwarf conifers and many others.
  • Private House (featured building)
  • Description: The Old Parsonage and The Croft.
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

This is a municipally-owned site for general public use. Please see: http://www.manchester.gov.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?documentID=2236

Directions

http://www.manchester.gov.uk/site/scripts/documents_info.php?categoryID=200073&documentID=2236&pageNumber=2
Authorities

Electoral Ward

  • Didsbury East
History

Detailed History

The four hectare grounds of the Old Parsonage and The Croft were developed by the mid-19th-century on a site to the north of Stenner Lane. In the early-20th-century the estate was owned by Robert Wood Williamson who sold it to Alderman Fletcher Moss in 1912. He in turn donated the estate to Manchester Corporation in the 1919.

The Croft is the founding place of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). This came about when a group of people were concerned about the extensive use of bird feather to decorate women's hats.

Manchester City Council enlarged the park to 8.5 hectares by adding the meadow which extends from the gardens for quarter of a mile to the Mersey. In the 1940s hothouses were built to house an orchid collection and in the 1950s the rockery, originally designed by Robert Wood Williamson, was extended. An alpine house was opened in 1967.

The gardens have held a Green Flag award since 2000.

Period

  • Mid 19th Century
Associated People

Just one person associated to Fletcher Moss Gardens

References

References