Cloverley Hall 5161

Calverhall, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Cloverly Hall features the remains of a 19th-century house and surrounding grounds. The site is now a Christian retreat and conference centre.

History

There were grounds attached to Cloverley Hall before 1808, and the site was formally imparked by 1827. The house was rebuilt in 1864 and the grounds expanded, with shrubberies laid out behind the house. Most of the house was pulled down between the two World Wars.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.cloverleyhall.com/

More information
Features
  • Manor House (featured building)
  • Description: The early house at Cloverley was replaced in 1864 with a new construction by Eden Nesfield in partnership with Norman Shaw. It was of red brick in the Elizabethan style, with transomed windows and straight gables. Most of the house was pulled down between the wars, and the dominant remaining feature is the tower, with a steep hipped roof enriched by dormers and Franco-Flemish style roofs.
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  • Drive
  • Description: A drive approaches the hall through the park from southwest to northeast.
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  • Shrubbery
  • Description: There were shrubberies laid out behind the house after it was rebuilt.
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  • Moat
  • Description: A medieval moat of unknown date is located behind the main house.
  • Icehouse
  • Description: There were two icehouses in the park.
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  • Hunting Lodge
  • Description: There were lodges set at either end of the drive.
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Access & Directions
History

Detailed History

The grounds around Cloverley Hall had been laid out before 1808, when they ran down to Cloverley Pool. By 1827, a small area had been formally imparked around the Hall and along the drive which approaches it from the south-west and north-east.

In 1864, the Hall was rebuilt by Eden Nesfield in partnership with Norman Shaw. It was constructed in brick in the Elizabethan style. By 1880 the area imparked had expanded to partly include Cloverley Pool.

After the rebuild of the house, the grounds were expanded and improved. By 1880, there were extensive shrubberies behind the house, as well as outbuildings and the remains of a medieval moat. Lodges had been built at either end of the drive. The park also contained two ice-houses and a saw mill.

Between the two World Wars, most of the house was pulled down, the principal rooms were regrouped, and the main wing was rebuilt with material from the original house. Since 1968, it has been a Christian retreat and conference centre.

Associated People
References

References