Cardigan Castle (also known as Castle Green)6690

Cardigan, Wales

Brief Description

The remains of a Regency period garden which was built within the ward of the medieval castle. Evergreen shrubs and hollies remain from the Regency garden, and the eastern curtain wall was re-arranged to create a hanging garden.

History

In the 18th century parts of the medieval castle were used as a town prison, and the inner ward was landscaped to provide a bowling green. A new house, Castle Green, was built after 1801, and the slope between the two towers was landscaped to create a hanging garden.

Detailed Description

The remains of a Regency period garden associated with a Regency house, Castle Green, which was built within the ward of the medieval castle. There is a fine Turkey Oak overhanging the castle walls, and the site included stables, outbuildings, a ruined vinery, and a World War 2 pillbox overlooking the Teifi. There was a bowling green on the site before Castle Green was built. Evergreen shrubs and hollies remain from the Regency garden, and the eastern curtain wall was re-arranged to create a hanging garden. The house became uninhabitable in the 1980s and is now the subject of a major restoration plan.
Features

Style

  • Gardenesque
Access & Directions

Directions

Travel north on A487 towards Cardigan. At first roundabout take B4546 signposted St Dogmaels. After 1/2 mile bear right into Cardigan. The road crosses the River Teifi and joins the one way system through the town centre. The castle is on the right and is entered from Bridge Street.
History

Detailed History

In the 18th century parts of the medieval castle were used as a town prison, and the inner ward was landscaped to provide a bowling green. In 1801 the site was acquired by John Bowen who built the new house Castle Green, and landscaped the slope between two towers to create a hanging garden. The house was enlarged in 1830 and a hothouse, pinery and fernery were addded to the grounds. Most of the surviving planting is attributed to the third purchaser, David Davies, from 1836. There has been neglect, but little 20th century addition to the garden, other than a small concrete pool (erroneously called the Italian garden) in the foundations of a former glasshouse, and the World War 2 pill box on the curtain wall. The castle was purchased by the Ceredigion County Council in 2003 and given to the Cadwgan Restoration Trust.
Contact

Official Website

Click Here

Other websites

Owners

  • Cadwgan Building Preservation Trust

    The Old Stables, 1 Green Street, Aberteifi/ Cardigan, SA43 1JA
References

References

Contributors

  • Caroline Palmer