Beachborough Park 319

near Folkestone, England, Kent, Shepway

Brief Description

Beachborough Park has the remnants of a 10 hectare (24 acre) estate which covered much of the hilly landscape to the south of Lyminge. The landmark feature known as Summer House Hill was once part of the grounds. In the early-18th century a formalised garden existed around the large gabled house. The house is now used for bed and breakfast accomodation. Please telephone 01303 275432 for details.

Detailed Description

The site has the remnants of a once important seat that included an imposing mansion and extensive estate covering much of the hilly landscape south of Lyminge. The landmark feature known as Summer House Hill was once part of the grounds.

In the early 18th century a formalised garden existed around the large gabled house (see illustration on cover of M Giraoud's book ‘Life in the English Country House', Yale University Press), with a bathing pool, grotto and prospect rotunda, while a canalised, brick-laid stream led to a cobbled carriage-washing pond.

Vestiges of the pool and carriage-washing pond still exist today and the grotto, although much decayed, still has its shell and flint lining intact on the edge of a now murky and silted pool above the house among a grove of beeches and sycamores. There is a good view of the English Channel.

Features
  • Grotto
  • Description: The grotto, although much decayed, still has its shell and flint lining intact on the edge of a now murky and silted pool.
  • Stream
  • Description: Canalised, brick laid stream.
  • Pond
  • Description: Cobbled carriage-washing pond.
  • Planting
  • Description: Walled garden.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
Lake
Access & Directions

Directions

The site is in the Shepway District. It lies 2 miles south-east of Lyminge, 4 miles north-west of Folkestone, just north of the A20.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Newington
History

Detailed History

The Drake Brockman family extended the house in the 18th century and built a temple cottage in the park, some ¼ mile east of the house, as a castellated eye-catcher. It still exists today in private hands.

Other vestiges of the 18th century are the lake to the south, and some parkland groups of trees.

Most of the house was destroyed by fire in the mid -1970s and the estate had already been broken up. The present owners restored the wings of the house, both rather gaunt Victorian features, and connected them with the original stone portico.

A large walled garden with massive 10 feet high brick walls probably dates from the early 18th century. It is abandoned at present. There are also evergreen oaks to the north¬east and some lawns and gardens. The October storm felled many important trees, especially on the north-east side. Tunnel development close to the south-east boundary has obliterated the lake and transformed the views. The outbuildings have been converted to flats.

References

References