Sutton Manor Nursing Home (also known as Sutton Manor, Sutton Scotney House)5169

Hampshire, England, Hampshire, Winchester

Brief Description

The site has an ancient manor from the 11th century. There is a Queen Anne house which, by the early-20th-century had nine acres (3.6 hectares) of ornamental gardens. There was also a shooting estate which, at one time, had 2760 acres (1,117 hectares). In the 1980s an ambitious Sculpture Park was begun. In 1986, the estate was reduced to 50 acres (20.2 hectares) and a Nursing Home was built. In 1996, Naomi House was also built in the grounds.

Detailed Description

In 1983, the Manor was acquired with 50 acres (20.2 hectares) of grounds by its present owner, Mrs Mary Cornelius-Reid. She opened a private nursing home in 1986. The Mews (formerly the Bothy) was converted into 12 self-contained flats and other sheltered accommodation has been built in the grounds. In 1995 a 99-year lease was granted to the Wessex Children's Hospice Trust to build a Hospice in the grounds. It was built in 1996 and named ‘Naomi House' after Mrs Cornelius-Reid's younger daughter.
Features
  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Glasshouse
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Lawn
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  • Garden Terrace
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  • Tennis Lawn
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  • Manor House (featured building)
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Wonston
History

Detailed History

The manor of Sutton was split into two from 1086 until 1545, when they were reunited under John Twyne, Lord of the adjacent Norton manor. It passed through many changes of ownership in the 18th and 19th centuries until Major M R Courage (later Colonel) of the well-known brewery family became Lord of the Manor in 1905.

Though the last vestiges of the manorial system were swept away by Parliament in 1926, the owners of Sutton manor had considerable influence in the Parish in the 20th century.At the time of Colonel Courage the estate comprised the Manor House which dated back to Queen Anne, various farms and village cottages and other properties, totalling in all 2760 acres (1,117 hectares).

In 1933 the estate was put up for sale and was bought by Mr J Arthur Rank, the film magnate. Rank had a zest for life and one of his hobbies was shooting. This was one of the features which appealed to him about Sutton Manor. The Sales Particulars explained that the game bag for 1930-31 season included some 2402 partridges. Rank added to the estate during and after the World War 2.

There were nine acres (3.6 hectares) of gardens in which there were ornamental trees, a walled garden, lawns, terraces, glasshouses, a rose garden, kitchen garden and later a sunken tennis court and a swimming pool.

When Lord Rank died in 1972, the estate was partially broken up in order to pay death duties. The bulk of the agricultural land was sold to the Eagle Star Insurance Company. The Eagle Star Chairman, Sir Denis Mountain who lived at Shawford House, was also on the board of the Rank Organisation.

Lord Rank's family stayed at Sutton Manor for a few years until it was sold to Mr and Mrs Tony Davies in 1978. The Davies turned the complex of greenhouses and the walled garden into a herb farm. In 1981 the Manor changed hands again and was sold to Mr Alex Herbage, who had a lavish lifestyle and owned many other estates. He started an ambitious renovation programme intending to create an Art Gallery and Sculpture Park.

The park was opened to the public in 1983, with an extensive display of 20th century sculpture. The venture did not last long as Mr Herbage was charged with defrauding 3000 US investors of 38 million dollars. His assets were confiscated and sold and Sutton Manor was acquired with 50 acres (20.2 hectares) of grounds by its present owner, Mrs Mary Cornelius-Reid.

References

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