Sundorne Castle 6684

Shrewsbury, England, Shropshire

Brief Description

Sundorne Castle featured a hall surrounded by four acres of gardens and an extensive park.

History

Sundorne Castle park was laid out between 1766 and 1806, and the grounds were altered several times in the 19th century. The house and grounds are now lost.

Detailed Description

When Sundorne Castle park was first recorded in 1806, it was apparently well established. It incorporated the ruins of Haughmond Abbey, and covered land both to the north and to the south of the Shrewsbury-Newport road. The western extent of the estate was formed by a 60-acre artificial lake, called Sundorne Pool, which was called 'new-made' in 1777. The grounds were partially wooded, and the perimeter of the park was well-defined by the five-mile drive created in the late 18th or very early 19th century. The hall was sited in the north-west of the park, and was approached by a drive, which perhaps was tree-lined, from the main road. The entrance to this drive lay close to the southern extent of the lake.

By 1826-27 there were at least two further drives: one ran west from the Abbey ruins, and a second ran south-east from the north-west extent of the park. A third drive, which survived in 1880 as a trackway, may have run north-west to the hall from the south-eastern boundary of the park.

Between 1826-27 and 1833 there was a reduction in the southern area of the park, where the Shrewsbury-Newport road became the new boundary. Between 1833 and 1880 a further change to the boundaries occurred in the north. Here, some area was lost to the east of the hall, but was somewhat balanced by the additions to the west. Features of the park in the late 19th century included: wooded areas, mainly in the west; a boathouse on the eastern shore of Sundorne Pool; several footpaths and trackways in the south; and a lodge at the entrance of the main avenue. By 1891, a long avenue of hardwoods ran along the foot of Haughmond Hill, and the trees may have flourished there until the mid-20th century.

The gardens around the

house included four acres of kitchen gardens, which in 1919 included a palm house. There were also greenhouses, forcing houses,

and vineries. There were also bothies, presumably to accommodate garden labourers.

Features
  • Country House (featured building)
  • Description: Sundorne Castle was originally a Georgian house of the mid-18th century, but only a staircase remains of that period. Most of the house was rebuilt before 1831 into a castellated brick mansion, and there are a gatehouse and wall of similar style. The wall still stands, but the house was pulled down in the mid-20th century.
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  • Lake
  • Description: Sundorne Pool is a 60-acre lake lying west of the hall.
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  • Drive
  • Description: The main drive ran north-west from the main road to the hall. The entrance to this drive lay close to the southern extent of the lake.
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  • Drive
  • Description: There were at least three more drives by 1827. One ran west from the Abbey ruins, and a second ran south-east from the north-west extent of the park. A third drive may have run north-west to the hall from the south-eastern boundary of the park.
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  • Gate Lodge
  • Description: There was an entrance lodge at the bottom of the main avenue.
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  • Avenue
  • Description: An avenue lined with hardwoods ran along the foot of Haughmond Hill.
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  • Boat House
  • Description: There was a boathouse on the eastern shore of Sundorne Pool.
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  • Palm House
  • Description: By 1919 there was a palm house in the kitchen gardens around the hall.
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  • Bothy
  • Description: There were bothies in the gardens, presumably to accommodate garden labourers.
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Uffington
History

Detailed History

Sundorne's grounds were laid out sometime between the building of the hall in 1766 and the first record of the park in 1806, when they were well-established. Further drives and a lodge had been added by 1827, and the park was altered in extent between 1827 and 1833, and again between 1833 and 1880. By 1891, an avenue, lodge, and boathouse had been added. The hall, park, and gardens seem to have remained in existence until at least the early 20th century, but the house and landscaped grounds are now lost. A castellated brick wall still stands, and the land has been turned to agriculture.

Period

  • 18th Century
  • Late 18th Century
References

References