Shendish Manor 9542

Hemel Hempstead, England, Hertfordshire, Dacorum

Brief Description

This is an estate laid out by an eminent 19th century garden designer for a member of an important local industrial concern. The importance of this as part of the local heritage is reflected in the PaperTrail project which highlights the paper industry in Hemel Hempstead. The park is now laid out as a golf course. Some areas of parkland remain, with mature cedars and pines. The walled kitchen garden lies to the north-west of the house and features a listed octagonal summerhouse.

History

The Shendish estate was purchased by Charles Longman, the nephew of John Longman, who had been the sleeping partner of John Dickinson (owner of Abbots Hill).The grounds were laid out by Edward Kemp who used the design as an illustration in his book 'How to lay out a Small Garden' (2nd Ed 1858). Kemp was a pupil of Paxton and also worked at Chatsworth and Birkenhead Park. Some of his ideas were drawn from John Claudius Loudon. The estate was sold by the Longman family in 1930 and in 1937 was purchased by John Dickinson as a Guild of Sport.

Features
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The house was built for Longman in 1854-6 with a garden room wing dated 1871, new entrance porch 1902, garden porch dated 1910. Grey brick with Bath stone dressings and chimneys. Portland stone plinth, and steep graduated slate roofs. 2 storeys, attics and basement. A large L-shaped Jacobean style house facing E. Near symmetrical 5-part E front with corresponding stepping of roofline and separate stone gable parapets and end chimneys to each part. Slightly projecting 3 windows wide centre with large canted bay window to ground floor rising from basement area with stone balustrade. Grey brick S front to walled garden with 3 Tudor arched entrances and pilasters alternating with piers.
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  • Kitchen Garden
  • Description: Walled Kitchen Garden: This is situated to the northwest of the house accessed by an iron gate of 1898. There is a (listed Grade II) octagonal summerhouse at its SW angle with mosaic floor (damaged) and carved stone decoration. A second walled garden, smaller than the first and lying to the west of it once contained glasshouses but it now derelict.
  • Approach
  • Description: The approach is from the west along a drive through tree studded undulating parkland.
  • Planting
  • Description: Pleasure grounds: The plans were drawn up in 1853/54 and much new planting was required both here and in the park. Much of the major tree planting has survived. The elaborate formal mounded bed close to the house may have The gardens, as depicted on the Ordnance Survey maps, were at their most intricate at the end of the 19th century with wooded areas and winding paths which were simplified in the early 20th century. The Dutch pipe garden and rock garden survived until 1946 although the conservatory disappeared between 1908 and 1913.
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  • Planting
  • Description: Park: Three hundred hectares. Although now laid out as a golf course there are still areas of parkland with mature cedars and pines.
  • Building
  • Description: Farm: Apsley Manor Farmhouse is 130 metres to northwest of Shendish House. Built c. 1853 for Charles Longman in uncoursed knapped flint with grey brick dressings under a red tiled roof. With ornamental bargeboards to the gables. Two storey- H plan house.
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Summerhouse
History

Period

  • Mid 19th Century
Associated People

Just one person associated to Shendish Manor

References

Contributors

  • Kate Harwood

    1

  • Hertfordshire Gardens Trust