Richmond Terrace, Clifton 4205

Bristol, England

Brief Description

Origiinally called Richmond Place, this private, communal garden is an example of an early enclosed pleasure ground to the rear of a Clifton terrace and is situated within the Clifton conservation area. The communal garden (shrubbery or pleasure ground) is enclosed on three sides behind the individual rear, walled gardens of Richmond Terrace houses with access by doorways in their rear garden walls and on the fourth side by a stone wall with cast iron double gates.It is situated within the Clifton conservation area.

History

The terrace was originally called Richmond Place. The layout of the private, communal garden has been adapted to current needs over the years.

Detailed Description

Originally called Richmond Place, Richmond Terrace is an outward facing square - the houses form three sides of the square and the fourth side is formed by a stone wall with central double cast iron gates set in random rubble walls with simple bath stone piers (possibly original). The private communal garden (shrubbery or pleasure ground) is enclosed on three sides behind the individual walled rear gardens of Richmond Terrace with access by dooways in the rear garden walls.

The garden is an example of an early enclosed pleasure ground to the rear of a Clifton terrace and is situated within the Clifton conservation area.

It is managed with communal open grassed areas, trees, shrubs, a pond and wildlife areas. Some individual garden plots remain and these are planted with fruit trees, vegetables, shrubs and herbaceous plants.

Features

Plant Environment

  • Environment
  • Walled Garden
  • Terrace (featured building)
  • Description: Terrace of 35 houses
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
History

Detailed History

Originally called Richmond Place, the terrace dates from 1791 and the private communal garden was always intended to form an integral part of the design. None of the original planting remains though a description of the origional intentions exists.

During World War Two the site was divided up into individual plots for vegetable growing - 'dig for victory'. Currently the site is managed with open grassed areas, trees, shrubs and some individual garden plots.

Period

  • 18th Century
  • Late 18th Century
Associated People