Kirtling Tower 4124

Kirtling, England, Cambridgeshire, East Cambridgeshire

Brief Description

Features include a moat, yew hedges, a walled kitchen garden and an avenue.

History

Kirtling Tower was created in the early-16th century as a private residence.

Detailed Description

Lord North's son, Roger accompanied Queen Elizabeth in 1578 on her progression from Greenwich to Norfolk to avoid the plague. On the return journey the Queen stayed at Kirtling Tower set amongst orchards, gardens and outer courts. A banqueting house and a ‘standing' in the park for the hunting were built for her day's visit.

The moat is the largest surviving one in Cambridgeshire and encloses a rectangular area which has been levelled, although the land slopes rapidly away to the north-east. Owing to this slope the moat only contains water in the north and east sides, the south side has been filled in. Outside the moat to the west is a bank which ends in a mound at the north corner.

During the 1930s the gardens around the Tower consisted of yew hedges with views towards the moat. There was a walled kitchen garden and an avenue to the south through the fields. The present owners are developing the gardens in the walled garden to the south of the Tower.

Features
  • Moat
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  • Avenue
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  • Hedge
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  • Kitchen Garden
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Tower (featured building)
  • And House
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Kirtling
History

Detailed History

A huge brick gate-tower and house was built in 1530 for the 1st Lord North and was situated within the moated site once owned by King Harold. The house itself was enlarged in 1578.

In 1801 the 9th Lord North demolished the house but the gate-tower remains today, and now forms part of the house which was built in the mid-19th century by J. A. Hansom.

Period

  • 16th Century