Homeyard Botanical Gardens 4358

Teignmouth, England, Devon, Teignbridge

Brief Description

Homeyard Botanical Garden was created by Maria Laetitia Kempe Homeyard in the late-1920s. Mrs Homeyard died in 1944, and in 1950 Teignmouth Town Council purchased the gardens from the Public Trustee. The gardens were officially opened in 1955.

History

The garden were created by by Maria Laetitia Kempe Homeyard in the late-1920s. Other work was ongaoing until her death in 1944.

Visitor Facilities

The gardens are open to the public.
Features
Pond
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The gardens are open to the public.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Shaldon
History

Detailed History

Homeyard Botanical Garden was created by Maria Laetitia Kempe Homeyard in thelate 1920s. Her husband, William Newcombe Homeyard was the inventor and manufacturer of Liqufruta cough syrup. The garden was created from steeply sloping fields with a north-facing aspect, and the first piece of land was purchased by Mrs Homeyard a year after her husband's death. She lived in Ness Cottage at the eastern end of the gardens. The garden design was possibly influenced by various Cornish gardens, as her mother's family owned properties in Veryan and Portscatho.

The main feature of the gardens is the series of paths and terraces, offering glorious views of Teignmouth and beyond, with a Cupressus macrocarpa avenue leading down to a spring-fed pond. A sham castle was built in 1931 and was once used as a summer house. Now, sadly it is in a dilapidated state.

Mrs Homeyard died in 1944, and in 1950 Teignmouth Town Council purchased the gardens from the Public Trustee. The gardens were officially opened in 1955. In the early 1990s a Friends' group was established and has cleared and restocked the pond, and published a leaflet on the history of the garden.

Work in the gardens from 1995 to 2000 has seen the removal of the Cupressus macrocarpa avenue and the thinning of the dense screen planting along the garden boundary with Horse Lane. These works have provided considerably more light to this part of the garden. The maintenance of hard landscape features is ongoing and since 1997 the main flight of steps through the garden from Torquay Road were reconstructed.

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)
References

References