Homerton College, Cambridge 4075

Cambridge, England, Cambridgeshire, Cambridge

Brief Description

A college garden extending over 10 hectares and featuring lawns, terraces, mature trees and a range of specimen plants including a Caucasian wing nut.

History

The college buildings were constructed in 1876 although Homerton College did not move from London until 1894.

Visitor Facilities

http://www.homerton.cam.ac.uk/home.html

Detailed Description

Situated along Hills Road, the college stands in 10 hectares of grounds behind mature trees, including cut-leaved beech. This original planting then continues into the site with purple beech, phillyrea and catalpa.

The impressive range of buildings overlook a large lawn enclosed by a row of smaller trees and shrubs with a path through long grass. To the south of the site is a fine lime tree avenue which then turns along an old field boundary; the College is obliged to maintain this avenue for ever.

Along the south side of the buildings is a terrace with two recesses. One is planted in memory of a disabled student with Mediterranean and grey-leaved shrubs arranged around a sundial. The other recess is a memorial garden for head gardener, Joan Salter, and is filled with large-leaved purple and yellow shrubs growing over paving and through gravel.

Also to the south are the remains of an orchard established by Joan Salter, and along the western boundary a planting of hornbeams and North American conifers screen the playing fields from the railway line.

A new library has recently been built in the south corner of the grounds, which also provides car parking spaces for visitors. The new planting around the building is dominated by a specimen Caucasian wing nut.

Further north, but within the College grounds, is Trumpington House which has a collection of hollies, a fine purple beech, cedar, evergreen oak and large yews around the front lawn.

To the rear is a fallen mulberry, a Wellingtonia and the remains of a small orchard. The Victorian house has vertical metal rods to the eaves to support climbing plants. Along the north drive is a boundary brick wall supported by metal buttresses with climbers and shrubs planted by Joan Salter.

Features
  • College (featured building)
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
Tree Avenue, Sundial, Lawn, Terrace, Orchard
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

http://www.homerton.cam.ac.uk/home.html
History

Detailed History

The first range of buildings erected in 1876 by Giles & Gough were for Cavendish College with Homerton College moving from London in 1894.

Joan Salter, an enthusiastic head gardener, ran an extensive market garden with the help of students from 1935, and pigs were kept until 1980.

Today the college is used to train teachers.

Associated People

Just one person associated to Homerton College, Cambridge

References