Blendworth Lodge 4864

Waterlooville, England, Hampshire, East Hampshire

Brief Description

This site was created in the early 20th century from a severely-damaged 19th-century home. The house was refurbished in the late 20th century. There is also a new garden incorporating 19th-century American planting. Other features include a ha-ha with views over ancient pasture. Alienated but surviving are the walled garden, gardener's cottage, parkland trees, stable walls and turning circle.

History

Sir William Knighton purchased ancient pasture east of Blendworth Cottage. After 1839, Sir William's son increased the parkland size and refurbished the parkland with American tree species.

Detailed Description

The present owners of Blendworth Lodge have made essential repairs and created a new garden based on Sir William Wellesley Knighton's American planting.
Features
  • Mansion (featured building)
  • Description: In 1820, the original cottage was purchased by Sir William Knighton as a retreat from the court of King George IV. By 1839 Blendworth Cottage was termed a 'Lodge' due to its increase in size. Most of Blendworth Lodge was destroyed in a fire in 1917. The remaining parts of the mansion were renovated and sold to various owners.
  • Latest Date:
  • Garden Building
  • Description: Gardener's cottage.
  • Stable Block
  • Description: Stable walls.
Ha-ha
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Horndean
History

Detailed History

Blendworth Lodge has been a cottage ornee, a mansion and a farmhouse. It is now a family home.

In 1820 Sir William Knighton, physician and Keeper of the Privy Purse to George IV, bought Blendworth Cottage as a retreat from Court, his wife having family in Blendworth. He later added ancient pasture east of the cottage.

By 1839, three years after Sir William's death, his four-bedroomed cottage ornee had become a mansion called Blendworth Lodge. His son, Sir William Wellesley Knighton, surrounded it with grounds that eventually covered the sites of two family homes and a rectory. To the mature parkland that he acquired, Sir William Wellesley Knighton added American planting including sequoia, cedar, liquid amber, ginkgo and tulip tree. Later owners built a ha-ha over which to view the pasture.

In 1917 Blendworth Lodge was severely damaged by fire. Its remains, mostly two late-19th-century extensions at the south end, were made into a smaller house and all but its immediate grounds were sold off. The mature parkland west of the house went for housing but retained many trees. The walled garden, gardener's cottage and pasture survived despite separate ownerships. At the stables site the turning circle and some of the stable walls were preserved. During the 1920s Blendworth Lodge was a farmhouse with rented farmland.

References

References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust