Cadlington House 4866

Waterlooville, England, Hampshire, East Hampshire

Brief Description

Cadlington House has gardens and meadows created since the 19th century. The house is a residential home for young people. The 19th-century walled garden houses a horticultural training project. The rear garden contains flowering shrubs and specimen trees.

History

Cadlington House was built for the marriage in 1829 of Dorothea Knighton to her cousin, Captain Michael Seymour RN.

Detailed Description

In 1937 Cadlington was bought by Rear-Admiral Arthur Murray DSO whose family made it an important part of village life. When Mrs Murray died in 1976 she left the house to be sold below market price to MENCAP. It is now a residential home for young people. She bequeathed the walled garden and adjacent field to establish a horticultural training project, the New Blendworth Centre.

The rear garden of flowering shrubs, specimen trees and informal lawn is a wildlife haven. The house and perimeter walls have flint galletting. The old lane and stables survive.

Features

Plant Environment

  • Walled Garden
  • Environment
  • Drive
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  • House (featured building)
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Specimen Tree, Stable Block
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Horndean
History

Detailed History

Cadlington House was built for the marriage in 1829 of Dorothea Knighton to her cousin, Captain Michael Seymour RN. The site was farmland next to their family homes, Blendworth Lodge (HR1361) and the old Blendworth House (HR1834). Cadlington was named after one of the fields.

Access was a lane past the front of the house, on its west side. When the lane was closed in 1850 Cadlington retained its portion but had a carriage drive from the nearest road. Between 1839 and 1870 a walled garden replaced a cottage in front of the house. East of the house were lawns encircled with curved paths and planted with specimen trees and a shrubbery. North of the house were outbuildings and later a model farm.

In 1862 Seymour, by then Admiral Sir Michael Seymour, and his brother-in-law, Sir William Wellesley Knighton of Blendworth Lodge, bought the old Blendworth House to extend their grounds with its meadows and mature parkland. During the 1920s and 1930s Cadlington was self-sufficient in flowers, fruit and vegetables. Its beds had box edging and its specimen trees were set in rollered lawns.

Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

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