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Alconbury House

Introduction

Features of Alconbury House include shrubberies, a wooded parkland, fine yew trees, a pavilion and extensive lawns.

The house is situated on a commanding site east of the village with the upgraded A1 in the valley below. There are commanding views to the south and west through heavily wooded parkland, now reduced to 20 hectares. Many elms were recently lost but fine yew planted prior to building the house still remains.

There is a short double avenue from the west with a drive through shrubberies to the house. From there a path leads, via extensive lawns around the house, to a walled garden with chamfered corners and a small pavilion along the south wall. To the north was an avenue from Ermine Street, now developed for a lorry park, which led to stables and other buildings.

History

This small country house was built in the late-18th century for Sir Peter Burnell, later Lord Gwydir, and enlarged in 1850 by Hodson and Vesey. The house was used as a USAF Officers’ Mess in the Second World War; Clark Gable and James Stewart were stationed at the nearby base.

Period

  • Late 18th Century
  • 18th Century
Features & Designations

Features

  • Shrub Feature
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  • Garden Wall
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  • Pavilion
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  • Path
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  • Walk
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  • Drive
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  • House (featured building)
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Key Information

Type

Garden

Purpose

Ornamental

Principal Building

House

Period

Late 18th Century

Survival

Extant

Civil Parish

Alconbury

References

Contributors

  • Cambridgeshire Gardens Trust