Swynford Paddocks, Six Mile Bottom (also known as The Lodge)4109

Six Mile Bottom, England, Cambridgeshire, Cambridge

Brief Description

Features of Swynford Paddocks include a drive, pleasure grounds, lawns and walks.

History

Swynford Paddocks was established in the early-18th century as a private residence.

Visitor Facilities

This site is a hotel. http://cambridge.thoroughbredhotels.co.uk/

Detailed Description

The sale particulars of 1917 list the winding carriage drive from the Entrance Lodge, the wealth of timber and ornamental deciduous trees in the pleasure grounds, shady gravel walks, and lawns comprising 21.6 hectares (54 acres). There was a walled garden and fruit garden with mushroom house, fruit store and second vegetable garden. The house was adorned with a tiled paved veranda.

The walled garden is now a car park, and is divided by a road lined with chestnut trees. It is also the site of the grave of the race horse Brigadier Gerard, winner of many races in the 1970s, including the 2000 Guineas, and the King George and Queen Elizabeth Stakes. The entrance porch is now surrounded by immaculately clipped pyracantha, and a small garden has been planted to the south of the hotel.

Features
  • Walk
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  • Drive
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  • Lawn
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Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

This site is a hotel. http://cambridge.thoroughbredhotels.co.uk/
History

Detailed History

Swynford Paddocks, formerly The Lodge, is now a hotel. In 1813 the property was owned by Colonel George Leigh and his wife Augusta, who was Lord Byron's half-sister. Byron was a frequent visitor to the house and wrote many of his works at the foot of a fine beech tree which was near the entrance door. Until 1976, it was the Newmarket home of Lord and Lady Halifax when they attended race meetings.