Royal Crescent 2866

Bath, England

Brief Description

Royal Crescent is a communal garden for the Crescent built between 1767 and 1775. The square is private, but can be viewed from all sides.

History

The site of the Royal Crescent was leased to John Wood on December 19-20th, 1766. Building commenced on May 21st, 1767.

Detailed Description

The garden of the Royal Crescent is a half-ellipse, laid out as a lawn on a sloping site. It is enclosed on the north by wrought iron railings, and on the south by a wall acting as a ha-ha.

The lawn in front of the Royal Crescent is very well-kept. Access to it is restricted, and it is kept clean and tidy.

Features
  • Terrace (featured building)
  • Description: A terraced crescent.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Ha-ha
  • Description: An unusual feature of the Royal Crescent is the use of a ha-ha to separate out the private lawn from the land beyond. This wall follows an ancient boundary line, allowing the view from the Crescent itself to continue uninterrupted. The date of its construction is unknown.
History

Detailed History

The site of the Royal Crescent was leased to John Wood on December 19-20th, 1766. Building commenced on May 21st, 1767. The crescent, the ‘summit of Palladian achievement in Bath' (see Ison, references) was completed over the next eight years.

When first built, the Crescent commanded an unobstructed view over common land which extended as far as the banks of the River Avon. A scheme for a formal garden, including fountains and shrubberies, was put forward in the 1850s. However, the open grass has survived without major changes.

Period

  • Late 18th Century
  • 18th Century
Contact
References

References

Contributors

  • Avon Gardens Trust

  • E.T.Thacker

    1