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Puckaster House

Introduction

Puckaster House is an important example of an Isle of Wight picturesque seaside garden, and one of the few examples of this garden type to survive in good condition.

Location, Area, Boundaries, Landform and Setting

Puckaster House is an important example of an Isle of Wight picturesque seaside garden and one of the few examples of this garden type to survive in good condition.Puckaster House is situated on sloping cliffs in Undercliff with extensive sea views.

To the east of the house is a formal area from which winding paths lead round the grounds, which are scattered with rocky outcrops.

Gardens and Pleasure Grounds

A gateway leads through a wall on the south edge of the pleasure grounds, beyond which is a level grass terrace offering sea views. To the south-east of the house is a walled enclosure, formerly the orchard. To the south of the house, in the south-west corner of the grounds, is the terraced walled kitchen garden, with the gardener's cottage beyond to the south. To the south again is a second orchard area (Jordan 1996).

The grounds feature gate piers (Listed Grade II) of early 19th century date. There is an estate cottage, a stable, a coach house, and the gardener's cottage.

Principal Building

The house is a large cottage orné, Listed Grade II. It was constructed in the early 19th century with alterations in the 20th century.

History

The following details of the historic development of the site at Puckaster House were supplied by the Isle of Wight Gardens Trust, with references used by them.

19th - 20th Century

Puckaster House was designed by Robert Lugar for James Vine prior to 1824 (Turley 1973). The house was enlarged and modified later in the 19th century, with early 20th century interior refurbishment (Lloyd and Pevsner 2006, 194). The house was occupied during World War II by Uffa Fox.

In the 20th century, details included a circular shrubbery; a walled garden and greenhouses, and an exotic garden. Steps led through rustic stone arches. There were terraces and stone revetment walls (Bilikowski 1986).

Maps

  • The property is shown on a map (Brannon 1824) and illustrated (Brannon 1825, 1834, 1837).
  • Illustrated (Views and plans. Lugar 1828). Lugar's book states that the grounds had been planted prior to the building of the house.
  • It is shown as "Park" on the Ordnance Survey (OS) 6" map of 1866. Features include wooded areas, orchards to the south-east and walled gardens to the south-west.

Features & Designations

Style

Picturesque

Key Information

Type

Garden

Purpose

Ornamental

Principal Building

House

Survival

Extant

References

References