Cassey Compton (also known as Compton Cassey House)6086

Cheltenham, England, Gloucestershire, Cotswold

Brief Description

The gardens at Cassey Compton consist largely of grassy areas, with yew trees on parallel banks flanking the house. The enclosing hard structure of the garden dates from the 17th century and there are also traces of the original layout. The canals, road bridge, stone piers with carved vase finials (some moved), some boundary walls and ha-ha are still in existence.

History

The gardens were laid out in the formal 17th-century style including parterres, a herb garden, yew topiary and a terrace-flanked ladies' garden. The manor house was rebuilt in about 1703, probably by Sir Richard Howe. After 1735 the house became a farmhouse, much reduced in size. The estate was split in the early 20th century and the house sold to a private owner.

Detailed Description

The house has a superb setting, flanked by yews on parallel banks, with a meadowland view towards Chedworth and the hills above. The gardens were laid out in the formal 17th-century style as depicted by Kip (early 18th century). Whilst all of the parterres and formal garden areas have been swept away, all of the enclosing hard structure still remains with relatively minor alterations. The gardens themselves have been reduced to simple grass areas, but the original layout is clearly discernible through earthworks. The canals, road bridge, stone piers with carved vase finials (some moved), some boundary walls and ha-ha are still in existence. Some alterations have been made to the entrance and garden to the rear of the house, but this does not effect the area of the original formal garden. The bowling green now has hay barns, but the banks and yew trees on two sides are still there, as is part of the boundary wall.
Features
  • Stable Block
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  • Canal
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  • Building
  • Description: Two late 18th-century barns, both listed grade II.
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Icehouse, Ha-ha, River
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Withington
History

Detailed History

The Manor and lands originally belonged to the Cassey family, who had a mansion there. In 1608 Thomas Rich (later of North Cerney) was probably living there and was still there in 1623. By 1636 the estate belonged to John Howe, who married Bridget daughter of Thomas Rich of N. Cerney and died in 1670. He was MP for Gloucestershire and created baronet in 1660. He was succeeded by his second son John Grubham Howe, who died by 1682. His widow Lady Annabell Howe passed it before 1701 to Richard Howe, her husband's nephew, who succeeded to the family baronetcy in 1703. It was probably (Sir) Richard Howe who altered and rebuilt the old manor house. Atkyns (1712) states: 'He hath built a large new house with delightful gardens and pleasant river running through them, with an agreeable prospect on large wood and on a Park of great extant.' Sir Richard died in 1730 and left Cassey Compton to his wife Mary with reversion to his kinsman John Howe of Stowell Park, later lst Lord Chedworth, a grandson of John Grubham Howe. Mary died in 1735 and the property then became a farmhouse.

The house had been much reduced in size before 1819 and only the north wing and part of the central block remained. The farmhouse remained with the Stowell Estate through various owners. In 1923 the Stowell Estate was split and Cassey Compton sold to Professor (Sir) William Somerville in 1927 and then sold again in 1998. The sale particulars of 1923 mentioned a kitchen garden with a sundial carved in the wall, a flower garden and a pasture orchard. The bridge over the River Coln led to a grass plot bounded by a wall, on either end of which were two stone columns topped by stone vases.

The house is currently (2008) tenanted out and the land farmed by the estate. Some of the outbuildings function as a gallery.

Contact
References

References

Contributors

  • Gloucestershire Gardens & Landscape Trust

  • Mary Blumer

    1

  • Yvonne Young

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  • Gary Chamberlayne

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