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Barking Abbey Ruins (also known as The Abbey of St Mary's)

Introduction

There are plans for re-landscaping of the whole Abbey Green site including the Abbey Ruins, subject to full approvals in 2011.

The ruined remains of Barking Abbey now form part of a public open space known as Abbey Green. It is recognisable for its partially restored Grade-II* Listed Curfew Tower.

Visitor Access, Directions & Contacts

Access contact details

Opening is unrestricted.

Directions

London Overground/Rail/Tube (Hammersmith & City, District): Barking. Bus: 5, 62, 87, 169, 179, 238, 287, 366, 368, 369, 387.

Owners

London Borough of Barking & Dagenham

History

7th - 10th Century

Originally established in the 7th century, from the late 10th century the abbey followed the Rule of St. Benedict.

14th Century

The abbey had a large endowment and sizeable income but suffered severely after 1377, when the River Thames flooded around 720 acres (290 ha) of the abbey's land, which was unable to be reclaimed.

16th Century

The abbey existed for almost 900 years, until its closure in 1539, as part of King Henry VIII's Dissolution of the Monasteries.

20th Century

In 1910, Barking Town UDC purchased the site to create an area for public recreation and during associated road works the Abbey foundations were discovered. The site was carefully excavated to reveal the ruined foundations. The Abbey Playing Field, incorporating the site of Barking Abbey, was opened as a public garden in 1913.

There are plans for re-landscaping of the whole Abbey Green site including the Abbey Ruins, subject to full approvals in 2011.

Period

  • 20th Century (1901 to 1932)
  • Early 20th Century (1901 to 1932)
Features & Designations

Designations

  • Conservation Area

  • Reference: Town Quay & Barking Abbey
  • Scheduled Ancient Monument

  • Site of Local Importance for Nature Conservation

Key Information

Type

Garden

Purpose

Ornamental

Principal Building

Heritage Site

Period

20th Century (1901 to 1932)

Survival

Extant

Hectares

1.5

Open to the public

Yes