War Memorial Park, Romsey (also known as War Memorial Park, Romsey)4910

England, Hampshire, Test Valley

Brief Description

The park was created on a two hectare (five acre) meadow, known locally as Street Mead, with money collected for a World War 1 memorial. It lies between two arms of the River Test, and comprises grassed areas and flower beds, a war memorial (1921) and a restored bandstand (2002). The park also incorporates a children's play area, bowling green and tennis courts. It is well maintained and in good order.In 2015 after an appeal, a ‘War Horse’ memorial statue was unveiled to commemorate the World War I centenary and the equine contribution, many horses having been trained at the Romsey Remount Centre.

History

After World War 1, money was collected for a memorial which was used to provide a public park. The park opened in 1920.

Visitor Facilities

The park is open daily from sunrise to sunset.

Detailed Description

The park remains much as it appeared at its opening in 1920, with grassed areas and planted beds. Lying between a fast-flowing arm of the Test from the Mill race and a calmer arm, its situation is very picturesque and provides an oasis of quiet.
Features
  • Flower Bed
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  • War Memorial
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  • Bandstand
  • Description: The bandstand was restored in 2002 based on Victorian castings.
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  • Garden Feature
  • Description: In June 1946, Lord Mountbatten donated the Japanese 150mm field gun which had been given to him as Supreme Allied Commander of the South-East Asia command when he received the surrender of the Japanese.
  • River
  • Description: River Test.
  • War Memorial
  • Description: In 2015 after an appeal, a ‘War Horse’ memorial statue was unveiled to commemorate the WWI centenary and the equine contribution, many horses having been trained at the Romsey Remount Centre.
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Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The park is open daily from sunrise to sunset.
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Romsey
History

Detailed History

After World War 1, money was collected for a memorial which was used to provide a public park. Opened in 1920, the park was created on wetlands of a two hectare (five acre) meadow known locally as Street Mead and owned by the former Romsey Borough Council. Hard core to shore up the wetland was transported from a redundant site of a ‘horse reform' ground, where some 4000 horses had been re-trained after military use during and after the war.

In June 1946, Lord Mountbatten donated the Japanese 150mm field gun which had been given to him as Supreme Allied Commander of the South-East Asia command when he received the surrender of the Japanese.

A war memorial was presented in 1921 and in the years between the two world wars a bandstand with a thatched roof was installed. The war memorial stands on an axis between the two arms of the river with the bandstand on the same axis. The bandstand later fell into disrepair and was removed but was restored in 2002, based on Victorian castings and without the thatch.

Period

  • Early 20th Century (1901-1932)
References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust

  • Lesley Wilson