Tichborne Park 5170

Winchester, England, Hampshire, Winchester

Brief Description

An old house was demolished in the early-19th-century and a new classical style one built with a Catholic chapel attached. The parkland appears little altered over many years, with the river widely canalised and dammed to form a lake.

History

The land was granted by King Edward in the 10th century to the Bishop of Winchester and held by the Tichborne family from at least 1135 to the present day. There was a house on the site in 1293 with its own private chapel.

Detailed Description

In 1908 Sir Henry A J Doughty Tichborne was the owner and in 1930, Sir Anthoy J H Doughty Tichborne. A description in the1970s mentions that the river passes between massive chestnut trees, is widely canalised with cascades as well as being dammed to form a lake. Two yews at the back of the house mark the site of an original drawbridge.
Features
  • Moat
  • Description: In the 19th century, the house was surrounded by mature parkland and there was a waterfall and three-sided moat.
  • Canal
  • Description: The river is widely canalised.
  • Lake
  • Description: The river is dammed to form a lake.
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The old house was replaced in 1803 in classical style and a new Catholic chapel attached.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Tree Feature
  • Description: Two yews at the back of the house mark the site of an original drawbridge.
Waterfall, Cascade
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Tichborne
History

Detailed History

Land at Tichborne has been held by the Tichborne family from at least 1135 to the present day. There was a house on the site in 1293 with its own private chapel.The Tichborne Dole legend dates from the 12th century, when the dying Lady Mabella was granted for the poor as much as would grow on land she could crawl round. There is still an area called the Crawls. In 1670, Gillis van Tilborch painted Sir Henry Tichborne distributing the Tichborne Dole in front of the old house, which was demolished at the end of the 18th century. It was replaced in 1803 in classical style and a new Catholic chapel attached.

In the 19th century, the house was surrounded by mature parkland and there was a waterfall and three-sided moat.

Contact
References

References

Contributors

  • Hampshire Gardens Trust

  • Jean East

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