Temple Guiting House 6307

Cheltenham, England, Gloucestershire, Cotswold

Brief Description

The gardens at Temple Guiting House are a late 18th- and early 19th-century creation with many features characteristic of the picturesque landscape style.

History

The estate was developed from 1715 but the main phase of work covered the period from about 1790 to 1826.

Detailed Description

According to a 1986 survey by the Georgian Society surviving features of this miniature picturesque landscape include a terrace, lakes, a formal flower garden, a grotto, a tunnel, a ‘precipice' (for sublime intent) although now spoilt by a Victorian rockery against it, a spring fed stream with rustic steps over it, a plunge pool and ‘Roman' bath, a cyclopean bridge and a sunken drive. The time taken to undertake the works also reflects changes in garden style throughout its execution.

A rosary and french garden no longer exist.

Features

Style

  • Picturesque
  • Ornamental Bridge
  • Description: Two footbridges
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  • Ornamental Bridge
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  • Icehouse
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  • Grotto
  • Description: Grotto with a tunnel entrance also listed grade II.
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  • Bath House
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Temple Guiting
History

Detailed History

The development of the estate was commenced by Rev George Talbot (1715-85). His son inherited in 1785 and is the main figure in the development of the estate as a picturesque landscape. The works began about 1790 and proceeded gradually until at least 1826, mainly due to his need to close and divert paths and roads through the estate. The estate gradually became an object of much local admiration and is recorded in Francis Witt's diary of 1827 in some detail and again in the 1836 sale particulars after Talbot's death.
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here
References

References

Contributors

  • Gloucestershire Gardens & Landscape Trust