Slindon Park 5319

West Sussex, England, West Sussex, Arun

Pgds 20110612 200613 Ntpl 181906

Brief Description

The house is well-sited on a high shelf of the South Downs with a fine view over parkland to the south where the ground drops away steeply. There is a view to Bognor in the distance. There are a few fine specimen trees still standing (before the 1987 storm) including beech and cedar. The walled gardens remain. The park and grounds are well cared for by the National Trust. Few traces of earlier garden layouts remain.

History

The site was originally a deer park dating from 1108. The first house was given by Henry I to the Archbishops of Canterbury. It became their summer residence until the dissolution. One tower remains (listed Grade II). The house was re-built around 1560 (this is still incorporated in the east side).

Visitor Facilities

The site is in the care of the National Trust, and is open to the public. More information

Detailed Description

The house is well-sited on a high shelf of the South Downs with a fine view over parkland to the south where the ground drops away steeply. There is a view to Bognor in the distance. There is no sign of any formal terrace on the south side of the house but a painting of 1922 shows a grassed terrace with steps down between rockeries, traces of which still remain. There are a few fine specimen trees still standing (before the 1987 storm) including beech and cedar. The walled gardens remain.

The park and grounds are well cared for by the National Trust. The headmaster of the school took over the site in 1972 and the grounds near the house were very overgrown. Few traces of earlier garden layouts remain. Restoration of the grounds near the house was undertaken in the ensuing years.

Garden buildings still extant are:

• The tower, dating from before 1560, is listed Grade II. Only the masonry of the lower part remains, with no medieval detail. It is built up with flint and gothic battlements and situated close to the house.

• The Gothic lodge with battlemented tower: There is a fine flint gateway and lodge, dating from the early-19th-century.

• Nore Tower Folly, built in 1814. There is a flint archway with small summerhouse attached, which was built as a eye-catcher and for shooting lunches. This feature lies half a mile north-west of the house, and was recently restored by the National Trust.

• Conservatory: There is a large apsidal conservatory standing at right angles to the west side of the house. It is Victorian and recently restored.

• Small modern temple

• Walled gardens, south of house with an entrance from the village.

Features
  • House (featured building)
  • Description: The house has flint with stone dressings, mullion and transom windows.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Tower
  • Description: The tower, dating from before 1560, is listed Grade II. Only the masonry of the lower part remains, with no medieval detail. It is built up with flint and gothic battlements and situated close to the house.
  • Latest Date:
  • Gate Lodge
  • Description: The Gothic lodge with battlemented tower: There is a fine flint gateway and lodge, dating from the early-19th-century.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Folly
  • Description: Nore Tower Folly. There is a flint archway with small summerhouse attached, which was built as a eye-catcher and for shooting lunches. This feature lies half a mile north-west of the house, and was recently restored by the National Trust.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Temple
  • Description: Small modern temple.
  • Conservatory
  • Description: Conservatory: There is a large apsidal conservatory standing at right angles to the west side of the house. It is Victorian and recently restored.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
  • Wall
  • Description: Walled gardens, south of house with an entrance from the village.
Access & Directions

Access Contact Details

The site is in the care of the National Trust, and is open to the public.

Directions

The site is off the A29 near Arundel. http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/slindon-estate/how-to-get-here/
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Slindon
History

Detailed History

The site was originally a deer park dating from 1108. The first house was given by Henry I to the Archbishops of Canterbury. It became their summer residence until the dissolution. One tower remains (listed Grade II). The house was re-built around 1560 (this is still incorporated in the east side).

Following a fire, the house was altered and re-built almost completely in 1927 with flint with stone dressings, mullion and transom windows. In 1948, the house and estate of 3,600 acres was gifted to the National Trust by Mr Wooton Isaacson. In 1980, the house was being used by Slindon School, but the present situation is unknown.

Period

  • Medieval (1066-1540)
  • 12th Century
Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Other websites

Owners

  • The National Trust

    Heelis, Kemble Drive, Swindon, SN2 2NA
References

Contributors

  • Sussex Gardens Trust