Aldingbourne House (also known as Norton Place)5305

Aldingbourne, England, West Sussex, Arun

Brief Description

The Ordnance Survey 1st edition 25 inch map shows established parkland and gardens around the house. The present house was built around 1800 for the Portsmouth merchant, Miles Rowe of Norton. The ownership of the site is now divided, with the principal building in use as residential flats.The extant of the remaining garden is unclear.

History

The house was built in 1800 and substantially enlarged in 1814. The grounds were laid out in the same period.

Detailed Description

In 1999 the estate was sold in seven lots, the house for conversion into flats and the outbuildings into houses.
Features
  • Flats (featured building)
  • Description: It is a stock brick villa, possibly in imitation of Goodwood.
  • Earliest Date:
  • Latest Date:
Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Aldingbourne
History

Detailed History

The Ordnance Survey 1st edition 25 inch map shows established parkland and gardens around the house. The present house was built around 1800 for the Portsmouth merchant, Miles Rowe of Norton. It is a stock brick villa, possibly in imitation of Goodwood. It was formerly called Norton Place. The estate was sold in 1814 to Henry Thomas Howard, the younger brother of the Duke of Norfolk who greatly enlarged it. In 1834 it was sold to Richard Hasler and was passed to his son, William Wyndham Hasler.

The Tithe Map of 1846 notes the owner to be Richard Hasler and that he was in possession of the mansion, offices, yards, gardens, plantation, lodge, park and substantial farmland. The design is maintained in the Ordnance Survey 1st edition 25 inch map which shows established parkland and gardens around the house. Horsfield notes that there were extensive views and that the grounds were laid out with great taste.

On 21 June 1921, Aldingbourne House became the property of West Sussex County Council, partly for small-holding purposes, and partly as a tuberculosis sanatorium. It was passed to the Government in 1946. Reference was made at the time to the original walled garden built of mellow brick, and beyond it the walled vegetable garden. The house was surrounded by levelled lawns studded with mature deciduous and coniferous trees, with open views to the parkland beyond.

Contact

Telephone

01793 445050

Official Website

Click Here
References

References

Contributors

  • Sussex Gardens Trust

  • Elizabeth O'Hea

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