Marske Hall 6657

Grinton, Richmond, England, North Yorkshire, Richmondshire

Brief Description

The earliest surviving part of the garden is probably the brick walled area at its northern edge, which may date from the 17th century. This contains greenhouses and faces the hall across the Marske Beck. The beck is a central feature of an ornamental garden with fishponds and a fountain. The hall is on the other side of the road, which cuts across an avenue of lime trees.

History

Marske Hall was re-built by Sir Timothy Hutton around 1600, and John Hutton I around a century or so later. The stable block was added by John Hutton II in around 1750. Scarborough College was evacuated to the hall in 1940, and the house is now divided into flats. The earliest part of the garden may date from the 17th century.

Detailed Description

Most of the garden is separated from the hall by the Richmond-Reeth turnpike, which was authorised in 1836.

The earliest surviving part of the garden is probably the brick walled area at its northern edge, which may date from the 17th century. This contains greenhouses and faces the hall across the Marske Beck. The beck is a central feature of an ornamental garden with fishponds and a fountain, which was developed after the construction of the turnpike.

The hall is on the other side of the road, which cuts across an avenue of lime trees which may have been planned as an approach to the hall before the turnpike's route was established. The east gateway to the hall was built when the road was constructed and is aligned with the avenue. John Hutton IV (1774-1841) planted trees widely. Specimen trees, including Austrian pine and American redwood occupy the garden, which leads into woods at the eastern end.

John Hutton IV built a Gothic barn as an eyecatcher. He also planted woods at Clints (on the north side of the valley) and in the former deer park, to the south-west of the hall. He erected an obelisk in the deer park as a monument to his brother, Matthew. Matthew died in 1814, and the obelisk occupies a favourite viewpoint from his youth.

Features
  • Flats (featured building)
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  • Stable Block
  • Description: The stable block was added by John Hutton II in around 1750.
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  • Wall
  • Description: The earliest surviving part of the garden is probably the brick walled area at its northern edge, which may date from the 17th century. This contains greenhouses and faces the hall across the Marske Beck.
  • Stream
  • Description: The beck is a central feature of an ornamental garden.
  • Fishpond
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  • Fountain
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  • Avenue
  • Description: There is an avenue of lime trees which may have been planned as an approach to the hall.
  • Specimen Tree
  • Description: Specimen trees, including Austrian pine and American redwood occupy the garden, which leads into woods at the eastern end.
  • Garden Building
  • Description: John Hutton IV built a Gothic barn as an eyecatcher.
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  • Obelisk
  • Description: John Hutton IV erected an obelisk in the deer park as a monument to his brother, Matthew. Matthew died in 1814, and the obelisk occupies a favourite viewpoint from his youth.
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Authorities

Civil Parish

  • Grinton
References

Contributors

  • Yorkshire Gardens Trust